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causes of upper motor neuron lesion

A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bert Liang
Specializes in Neurology
Extensor respons: The presence of a Babinski sign suggests an upper motor neuron lesion, although in infants the presence of the dorsiflexion of the great toe with plan ... Read More

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A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gamal Boutros
38 years experience Neurology
RELEASE PHENOMENA: The brain inhibit the babinski sign by controlling the lower neuron--when the corticospinal tract is injured(umnl)there is a release.
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A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Phillip Goebel
15 years experience Emergency Medicine
Neurologist: The physical exam findings will be more difficult to see, but a neurologist will be able to examine the patient and might elect to do testing such as ... Read More
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A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Variable, but: Typical results of a stroke affecting brainstem and rostral structures, could see focal weakness over unilateral arm and leg, with possible problem wi ... Read More
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A female asked:
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
35 years experience Pain Management
Lesion Localization: The upper motor neurons also called “Cortical Motor Neurons” are located in the motor cortex of the brain. The the spinal motor neurons are the lower ... Read More
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A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bert Liang
Specializes in Neurology
Fairly nonspecific: These findings don't suggest anything specific, but of course it would depend on the actual values of the nerve conduction studies and the findings on ... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ronald Herring
16 years experience Anesthesiology
ALS: Yes, in some individuals there does seem to be a prevalence for one versus the other. At least at the beginning of the disease. As it progresses both ... Read More
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A 5-year-old male asked:
Dr. Chan Hwang
26 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
PNS versus CNS: Electromyography & nerve conduction studies evaluate the peripheral nervous system (PNS), of which lower motor neurons are part. Upper motor neuro ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
49 years experience Internal Medicine
Impaired cranial nn: Cranial nerves 9 - 12. Are usually affected in bulbar palsy (a lower motor neuron disease, as compared to pseudobulbar palsy, which i just discussed). ... Read More
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A 5-year-old male asked:
Dr. Ajay Acharya
36 years experience Internal Medicine
Simple: Upper motor neuron disease causes rigidity. Lower motor neuron causes flaccidity and fasciculation. Leave it to the experts.
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
The end result: Yes, the final outcome is muscle weakness, regardless of where in the pathway the problem exists.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Congenital or due to: A problem with the 4th cranial nerve (which controls one of the muscles that move the eyeball) can be congenital, meaning the child is born with it (c ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Giannotta
48 years experience Neurosurgery
It can be: Not sure where you are getting your data. Tbi causes many diasabilities, potentially. Dysarthria is certainly one of them.
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A member asked:
Dr. Colin Kerr
43 years experience Family Medicine
Motor neuron disease: There are two relatively early signs of motor neuron disease (abnormal nerve function in the muscles rather than the spinal cord). First, your reflexe ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
No: Motor tics are considered a sign of electrical short circuiting of neural impulses.By themselves they produce no damage but may reflect some injury or ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bert Liang
Specializes in Neurology
EEG finding: I assume you received this as part of an EEG report. This is not specific but can relate to a localized difference within the functioning of that par ... Read More
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. John cuong Doan
17 years experience Family Medicine
MRI only tells: .. part of the story. If you have myoclonus and hyper-reflexia, you must establish a strong relationship with a good neurologist in order to get dia ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Hellman
28 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Efferent: Essentially signal along the efferent neurons that result in voluntary contraction of the muscle. Sensory information follows a different pathway.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
DBS: The technique of deep brain stimulation, inserting electrodes into areas of the basal ganglia and sub thalamic nucleus can substantially assist Parkin ... Read More
A 47-year-old male asked:
Dr. Amogh Sahai
19 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Not really...: Neuropathy and twitching are two different things which are not necessarily linked together. Symptoms of neuropathy include numbness in feet, burning ... Read More
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90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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