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can you have partial sleep paralysis

A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ruchir Patel
13 years experience Sleep Medicine
Sleep Paralysis: Can you be more specific? Sleep paralysis can be a normal phenomenon of being excessively sleepy where your physical body is stuck in "sleep" and you ... Read More
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A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Al Hegab
Dr. Al Hegab answered
39 years experience Allergy and Immunology
??: kindly see a psychiatrist for evaluation, or a neurologist, start with your primary doctor for initial assessment, wish you well
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
44 years experience Dentistry
See a doctor: Sleep paralysis is a phenomenon in which people, either when falling asleep or wakening, temporarily experience an inability to move. Not real common ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Sleep Paralysis: Some theories are; Disruption of REM sleep, Melatonin dysregulation, Genetics, Depression.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Korona
32 years experience Interventional Radiology
Yes: Depends which part of brain involved.
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Hanna
34 years experience Family Medicine
Not usually: Sleep paralysis is also referred to as a hypnogogic trance. It is more commonly linked with another common sleep disorder called narcolepsy.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Munshower
29 years experience Family Medicine
No: I am a physician, luckily never smoked, have been able to keep my weight at a healthy bmi, have no family history of osa, and I do not have osa. Than ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Courey
Specializes in Prosthodontics
Not typically: While sleep apnea and nightmares or night terrors are both sleep disorders, they are typically not related.
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A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Moranville
35 years experience Psychiatry
No: Depression does not cause seizures.
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jose Medina-Bairan
35 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
OSAS: It is not the severity of the sleep apnea, but the severity of the symptoms, in this case hypersomnolence, or being sleepy.
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Panic: Possible!
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hanul Bhandari
12 years experience Sleep Medicine
See below: Sleep paralysis is frustrating ; frightening. But not having good sleep creating sleep debt, can lead to more episodes of sleep paralysis, further ag ... Read More
A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Astrachan
36 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Yes: If you wake up feeling tired, are tired during the day, fall asleep watching tv or movies, feel like you want to nap then you may have a sleep disturb ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hanul Bhandari
12 years experience Sleep Medicine
See below: Sleep paralysis can occur without hallucinations as you fall asleep or wake up. Both can be independent occurrences. If you are experiencing these fre ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Megerian
27 years experience Pediatric Neurology
Few minute up to 20: Sleep paralysis usually occurs in 25 to 50 % of people who have narcolepsy. It can occur at the onset of sleep or upon awakening. The phenomenon las ... Read More
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A 37-year-old male asked:
Dr. Peter Glusker
46 years experience Neurology
Seizures in sleep: Yes. Seizures can occur at any time. They are more likely in the transitions from waking to sleep. But there are also sleep disorders that can look l ... Read More
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A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Maybe narcolepsy: True sleep paralysis is commonly encountered in narcolepsy, and can be successfully treated. So, yes, see a sleep specialist and get this diagnosed a ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: Yes.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Patrick Melder
26 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Absolutely: Sleep apnea is more common in the supine position ( on your back). It is usually more common and more severe in deep REM sleep. Both of these facts ar ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
17 years experience Sleep Medicine
Movement: The definition implies that you cannot move. This may last seconds or up to a minute.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
44 years experience Dentistry
See a doctor: Sleep paralysis is a phenomenon in which people, either when falling asleep or wakening, temporarily experience an inability to move. Not real common ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Hahn
23 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Typical symptoms: Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (osa) include snoring, witnessed pauses in breathing, snort arousals, feeling unrefreshed upon awakening, morning ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Cyma Khalily
34 years experience Psychiatry
CPAP: The fda approved indications for Modafinil (provigil)or Nuvigil are daytime fatigue with a diagnosis of sleep apnea treated with a CPAP or bipap, s ... Read More
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90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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