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can walking aggravate a hernia

A 61-year-old male asked:
Dr. Charles Stanton
Specializes in General Surgery
Yes it should: Most men get hernia repairs for symptoms, including pain with walking, lifting, pushing, etc.. If you have groin pain on the side of the hernia now, t ... Read More
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A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience General Surgery
Is about time: For complete healing in some may take another wk or so , go for a follow up visit o your surgeon.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sawyer
35 years experience General Surgery
Yes: Getting up and walking shortly after surgery is very good. It can help prevent certain complications like pulmonary atelectasis and deep vein thrombos ... Read More
A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Milton Mintz
66 years experience Geriatrics
Walking around: Shouldn't cause problems with hiatus hernia!-- see your pcp.
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Cunnar
26 years experience Family Medicine
It is likely: Short answer is yes. Anything that increased intra-abdominal pressure can extend (or worsen) a hernia. Be careful.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Bodell
49 years experience General Surgery
It is possible: Depending an the site location of the hernia and if it is reducible may affect breathing. Hernias that are not reducible usually cause pain and disco ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience General Surgery
Yes likely: But you need to watch for increasing pain & discomfort, esparcially if you get too vigorous or too strenuous like going up hill. If there is discomfor ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Buck Parker
16 years experience General Surgery
Yes: If the hernia is causing pain or discomfort during the activity i would recommend backing off, but in general you can run and jog with an inguinal her ... Read More
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A 53-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Burns
36 years experience Emergency Medicine
Retrolisthesis is: Relatively uncommon and has been associated with, but not definitively caused by vertebral degenerative disc disease, disc herniation, and facet arth ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Kaplan
41 years experience Colon and Rectal Surgery
Any activity: That increases abdominal pressure like crunches, sit ups, excessive coughing, straining to urinate or stool, or heavy lifting can aggravate a hernia. ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Rosen
33 years experience General Surgery
Indirectly, at best.: A hiatal hernia, by definition, is an enlarged opening in the diaphragm muscle that separates the chest from abdominal cavity. It is often used inter ... Read More
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A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Kleerekoper
50 years experience Endocrinology
Masturbation: Yes it could. Please see a Urologist about your hernia.
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A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Kuhnke
39 years experience General Surgery
Absolutely: There are no physical restrictions with any hernia, except for the amount of discomfort one does or does not have. You may lift, work hard , even wor ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Rimmer
38 years experience General Surgery
Yes: Umbilical hernias are common and are often asymptomatic if it causes pain or is getting bigger see a general surgeon and discuss surgical repair exe ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Ray Compton
29 years experience General Surgery
Yes: Exercise is always good. You will notice the bulge may increase in size with straining. But, the bulge is not the hernia. The hernia is the hole that ... Read More
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A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. Audie Rolnick
39 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Possible: If there is a definitive meniscal tear anything can aggravate. Usually however, it requires kneeling and bending or twisting to severely aggravate. Mi ... Read More
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Not normally: The baby is enclosed in the womb in a sea of amniotic fluid. This protects the baby. If the mother had a serious complication - then perhaps vigorous ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Erik Borncamp
24 years experience Wound care
Don't think so : It may exacerbate an existing weakness at the hiatus but i don't think it would "cause" it . A severe and sudden force, however, can cause traumatic ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Erik Borncamp
24 years experience Wound care
No: But exercises that increase the pressure in your abdomen (crunches) may exacerbate the symptoms of your hernia.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wendell Goins
41 years experience General Surgery
Be carefull: Hernias are a weakness in the abdominal wall resulting in a defect in the muscle layer. Therefore things that are supposed to stay protected inside ca ... Read More
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A 52-year-old male asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Hiatal hernia: Is deep inside your body it's not possible to push on it from outside though if you push on the abdomen the general pressure below the diaphragm may c ... Read More
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Amrit Singh
50 years experience Cardiology
Possible: not itself. But it can cause GERD which can cause SOB and coughing.
A 52-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rashid Khan
32 years experience Internal Medicine
Go to E.R: Get evaluated by an e.R physician.
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A 58-year-old male asked:
Dr. David Earle
30 years experience General Surgery
Unclear ?: Not sure what your question is, but in general, you're activity level should be based on pain and discomfort, not the fact that you had a hernia repai ... Read More

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