Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

calcium carbonate overdose

A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frederick Singer
57 years experience Endocrinology
Discontinue it.: Any side effect of excess calcium carbonate should be gone in several days after stopping use.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frederick Singer
57 years experience Endocrinology
Constipation.: Calcium carbonate may causes constipation. It was a common treatment of excess acidity in the past, .
6
6 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rick Kirschner
39 years experience General Practice
Seek medical help: Tums is calcium carbonate. Too much in the system can lead to digestive irritations, constipation and diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, muscle twitching ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
27 years experience Pediatrics
Yes: Please discuss this with your doctor.
2
2 thanks
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Go to ER: What do you mean by an overdose? How many tablets? Tums are calcium carbonate and a significant overdose can be fatal. If know or anyone you know has ... Read More
A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Edgar Mendizabal
54 years experience Internal Medicine
A little: they are calcium carbonate
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
20 years experience Pediatric Endocrinology
No: No, the only difference is that the former is better taken with food whereas the latter (calcium citrate) can be taken on an empty stomach.
1
1 thank
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Yes: Tum's can be used as a calcium supplement. The tum's smoothies taste better than the other tum's.
2
2 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Tums (calcium carbonate) –: Tums (Calcium Carbonate) is indicated for the treatment of indigestion, stomach upset & heart burn (as well as calcium deficiency). However, some ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Sneid
40 years experience Endocrinology
Either: Just make sure you take the proper amount to balance with your diet and take 2000 units vitamin d3 as well, citrate is easier to absorb and doesn't ne ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Thomas Heston
28 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: Should be safe for most people.
1
1 thank
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Seibert
34 years experience Gastroenterology
Not usually.: But it won't make diarrhea worse either. Other antacids, which contain magnesium, such as Mylanta, can cause diarrhea. Loperamide, also known as Imodi ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Kleerekoper
50 years experience Endocrinology
Calcium: Not much to choose from. Go to the drug store and look at the several options for calcium. Carefully read the comments on each one and choose the one ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Roscoe Nelson
27 years experience Urology
Yes: Tums (calcium carbonate) have calcium in them and excess calcium either stays in the the intestine and goes with a bm or is absorbed and goes out in t ... Read More
A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Eitner
33 years experience Family Medicine
No: No, it is made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. There is no aluminum in the compound. It is added in small amounts to Tums (calcium carbonate) an ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hillel Naon
42 years experience Pediatric Gastroenterology
May or may not: Tums (calcium carbonate) is used to treat symptoms caused by too much stomach acid such as heartburn, upset stomach, or indigestion. Calcium carbonate ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. S. Smiley Thakur
30 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
See below please: Glaxosmithkline consumer healthcare does not add aluminum during the manufacturing process of the tums® tablets but one of the raw materials used in t ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gregory Bussell
Specializes in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Constipation: Constipation can be related to using tums (calcium carbonate).
1
1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
Depends on goal: Tums (calcium carbonate) neutralize stomach acidity and can relieve symptoms of this including gerd. Tums (calcium carbonate) are a good source of ca ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Linda DiMeglio
27 years experience Pediatric Endocrinology
Either ok: Either form of calcium is reasonable to take as a supplement. Choose a form that you won't mind taking as some are definitely more palatable than othe ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Tums (calcium carbonate): Yes you can.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ralph Morgan Lewis
37 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: Too many Tums (or other antacids containing calcium carbonate) over an extended period of time can lead to "milk alkali syndrome" in which there are h ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Yes: Pepto-bismol ; Tums (calcium carbonate) don’t interact per drug interactions checker.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month