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A 44-year-old member asked:

I'm just wondering, if you have crohn's, what medication(s) are you on?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeremy Adler
A Verified Doctoranswered
28 years experience
Immune suppression: 1. 5-asa medications (sulfasalazine, asacol, (mesalamine) pentasa) may take the edge of symptoms, they do not adequately treat crohn's disease. 2. Steroids work, but are only useful for short course because of side effects. 3. Azathioprine (imuran), 6-mp, Methotrexate are often effective, and reduce the need for steroids 4. Remicade, Humira are very effective at treating fistulas or severe crohn's.

Similar questions

A 31-year-old member asked:

If you have crohn's, what medication(s) should you be on?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Imran Saeed
General Surgery 20 years experience
Several options: It all depends on the location and severity of your disease. You also need blood work and a PPD (TB) test before certain meds can be used. Sometimes you may need high dose steroids depending on the severity of the disease. Please discuss with your GI doc.

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Last updated Jan 4, 2015

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