U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A member asked:

how common is it for someone to need a complete blood count?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Internal Medicine 35 years experience
Very: We do cbcs routinely, looking for anemia, signs of infection, drug side effects, clues about blood cancers, bruising issues and it helps also to find closet alcohol drinkers who deny it!

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership

Similar questions

A 40-year-old member asked:

Complete blood count is just white cells, right?

2 doctor answers14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Walter Kobasa
Obstetrics and Gynecology 37 years experience
NO: Complete blood count includes white blood cell count, hematocrit hemoglobin platelets and a few other values.
A 37-year-old member asked:

What can you determine from a complete blood count?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. RADHA SYED
Gynecology 52 years experience
Blood count: Complete blood count is a very powerful information on many counts.It tells if you have anemia-if so what kind.For example iron deficiency or folate/b12 deficiency.It tells if you have infection then the white cell count goes up.It informs us of platelet deficiency or excess(as seen in certain cancers)-both very dangerous.It also gives a clue to leukemia and some kinds of thallasemias.
A 43-year-old member asked:

What all can a complete blood count show?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Dyson
Obstetrics and Gynecology 44 years experience
Anemia, infection,: The blood count is useful to test for anemia, infection, indications of vitamin deficiency (b-12 and folate) and inherited abnormal hemoglobin. It can sometimes give a clue to leukemias and lymphomas, allergies and a few other things.
A 40-year-old member asked:

What do my complete blood count results mean to a doctor?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Walter Kobasa
Obstetrics and Gynecology 37 years experience
Many things: It can tell if there is an infection, anemia and many other things depending on the results and your history and physical examination.
Dr. Martin Raff
Dr. Martin Raff commented
Infectious Disease 56 years experience
Also, once having established baseline values, changes in any of the parameters followed can be helpful in your follow-up sessions.
Apr 16, 2012
A 32-year-old member asked:

Why do I need to retake the complete blood count?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jonathan Song
Specializes in Gynecology
Multiple reasons: Complicated question. If you are anemic (low blood count) due to blood loss from a variety of different causes or chronic illnesses, a complete blood count (CBC) is done to assess severity, progress if you are on iron supplementation or to test for leukemia (blood cancers). It can be done also to rule out errors. Dehydration or recent IV fluid can impact results too which may require repeat cbc.

Related questions

A 18-year-old female asked:
2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
A 31-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
A 49-year-old member asked:
2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
A 51-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
A 35-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership
Last updated Jan 22, 2014

People also asked

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
$30 per visit with
membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.