A 38-year-old member asked:
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how can hypertension be related to pneumonia?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Elden Rand
21 years experience Cardiology
Indirectly: When someone has an infectious process such as a pneumonia, there will be a higher amount of stress hormones such as Epinephrine (adrenaline) and cortisol in the blood, which may increase the blood pressure. If there is bacteria in the blood, it is called sepsis, and may result in low blood pressure.
Answered on Aug 31, 2018
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1 thank
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
51 years experience Cardiology
Hypertension: Hypertension has no direct association with pneumonia.
Answered on May 27, 2013

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