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A member asked:

why do some children have allergies?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Arthur Torre
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 51 years experience
Hereditary: The ability to have allergies is hereditary. If one parent has allergy, there is about a 40% chance of the child having allergy. If both parents are allergic, the chances increase to about 70%. Allergy also requires exposure to an "allergen", like pollen, dust mite, molds or animals. So if there is no exposure, no symptoms occur.
Dr. Douglas Tzanetos
Allergy and Immunology 19 years experience
Genes + environment: To develop an allergy, you need a genetic predisposition. For example, children at highest risk of developing allergic asthma are those whose parents have asthma. Also necessary is multiple exposures to the allergen. The strongest predictor of developing allergies in the future is having allergic disease now (for example, a child with eczema has increased chance of developing asthma).
Dr. Boyan Hadjiev
Pediatrics 21 years experience
Exposure + Genes: One needs both a genetic component and "exposure" to a said allergen to develop an allergy. There is a growing support over the past 20 years, that growing up in an environment which is "too clean" can also lead to development of allergies down the road. Either way, allergies are on the rise.

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Similar questions

A 28-year-old member asked:

How are children tested for allergies these days?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Maziar Rezvani
Allergy and Immunology 21 years experience
Allergy testing: Usually encompasses skin and/or serum (blood) test which are consistent with the child's clinical history.
A 36-year-old member asked:

How are today's allergy tests performed on children?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Maziar Rezvani
Allergy and Immunology 21 years experience
Skin or Blood: Depending on the clinical history and suspected allergen, some practitioners choose the less painful and timely method, which is a blood test looking for specific ige antibodies, also called rast testing. Percutaneous skin tests are still the gold standard for allergy testing. This is something which you should discuss with your physician.
A 35-year-old member asked:

Can children grow out of seasonal allergies?

2 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Cindy Juster
Pediatrics 36 years experience
Sometimes: Some people's allergies get better over years, some get worse, and some are stable. Keeping allergies well-controlled not only keeps kids feeling better and sleeping better, but also doing better in school (it's hard to learn material when you feel miserable)! also, keeping allergies under control decreases the risk of ear infections and sinusitis.
Dr. Cindy Juster
Pediatrics 36 years experience
Provided original answer
You're welcome!
Jan 10, 2012
A 35-year-old member asked:

Is an h2 histamine blocker ok for children for allergies.?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Paul Williams
Allergy and Immunology 28 years experience
Doesn't help much: H2 histamine blocking drugs are safe for children with allergies to take, but they are of limited value in treating allergies.
A 45-year-old member asked:

What is the cause of environmental allergies in young children?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Doanh Nguyen, md, faaaai
Allergy and Immunology 14 years experience
Air-borne allergies: Environmental allergies affect your respiratory system including the nose, sinuses, eyes and if severe, the lung. Thus, symptoms are nasal congestion, sinus pressure, teary and itchy eyes, cough, wheezing, physical activity limitation and difficulty breathing if you have asthma.

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Last updated Sep 28, 2016

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