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A 31-year-old member asked:

can physical therapy help with sacroiliac joint dysfunction?

4 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin Stone
Specializes in Sports Medicine
Yes: It is important to have a thorough physical therapy evaluation to determine what is impacting your sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Treatments should focus on manual tissue and joint techniques to align and mobilize the area, as well as stabilization exercises to maintain equal forces around the joint and to protect the joint.
Dr. Susana Duncan
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 35 years experience
Yes to an extent: Si joint dysfunction is a term used to indicate pain in the joint. Pain due to inflammation or infection requires respectively, anti-inflammatory or antibiotic therapy. Like any other joint si can become arthritic. Physical therapy to strengthen muscles supporting the joint can help. If severely inflamed steroid injection helps; occasionally a nerve block is indicated to manage the pain.
Dr. Laurence Badgley
General Practice 53 years experience
Yes: The published reports of vert mooney (deceased), professor emeritus of orthopedic surgery at san diego medical school. He showed that strengthening of the strap of the gluteus ("butt" muscle) and the opposite side latissimus dorsi ("lats") imparted greater stability to an hypermobile sacroiliac joint. Surface emgs of these staps of muscles were means to the study measurements.
Dr. David Hardin
Wound care 36 years experience
Yes: The pt will use various heat modalities and start a program of "pelvic stabilization exercizes".

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Similar questions

CA
A 35-year-old member asked:

What physical therapy is appropriate for dislocated sc joint?

3 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joseph De Santi
Family Medicine 29 years experience
Guided Therapy: Depending upon whether this was an anterior or posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint you may or may not need surgery. If non-surgical, brief immobilization and then guided therapy with a physical therapist to increase range of motion and limit pain. If surgical, you may similarlly need immobilization and rehab but of a slightly longer duration. Most heal nicely without surgery.
A 41-year-old member asked:

What physical therapy is common for a stiff joint?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
Family Medicine 23 years experience
Various: Your physical therapist may choose to work on the range of motion for that joint, pain control and reducing the stiffness by using certain exercises, applying heat and cold substances, using ultrasound, tens unit, water therapy etc. Have him examine you and decide what modalities will serve you better.

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Last updated Jun 6, 2015
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