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A 32-year-old member asked:

how long does it take to recover from neuropraxia due to a dislocated knee?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Frederick Buechel, jr. md
Orthopedic Surgery 26 years experience
As much as 18 months: Neuropraxia's are stretch injuries to the nerve. The nerves can slowly regenerate and probably by 18 months your are maximized. You need to be followed by your orthopedist and if they recommend a neurologic workup you may get ncv/emg studies done to assess the nerve function.

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Similar questions

A 44-year-old member asked:

Does knee dislocation have any long-term consequences?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Frederick Buechel, jr. md
Orthopedic Surgery 26 years experience
Yes : Potentially post traumatic arthritis can occur. If you have just a knee cap dislocation, it may predispose you to future dislocations and anterior knee pain and arthritis. If it is your whole knee joint that dislocates, you risk nerve, vessel and ligament injury. This is a much more severe injury than just a patella dislocation.
A 45-year-old member asked:

Is a microfracture procedure advisable for a meniscus tear in the knee?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Frederick Buechel, jr. md
Orthopedic Surgery 26 years experience
NO: Microfracture is done when the end of the bone cartilage surface has an area that is worn off. You then use a small "pick" to puncture the bone in the area that the cartilage is worn off to try to make the bone bleed onto this surface and create some scar cartilage to form in the cartilage defect area. The repair cartilage is not normal cartilage but can help some patients. Not for meniscus tear.
A 29-year-old member asked:

What are some ways to prevent heel pain besides padding?

5 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ronald Oberman
Podiatry 31 years experience
Supportive footwear: Heel pain often caused by insufficient support of feet. Orthotics are very helpful.
A 37-year-old member asked:

What would you need to do to prepare for total knee replacement?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Frederick Buechel, jr. md
Orthopedic Surgery 26 years experience
Many options: To prepare for a total knee replacement first you should have an informed discussion with your surgeon. Then maximize your health for surgery. Improve your eating habits and take appropriated nutritionals. Do your best to pre-surgically exercise your thigh muscles and hamstrings in preparation for your postop rehab. Get your ice machine ready at home, your walker and a cane. These are basics.
Dr. Frederick Buechel, jr. md
Orthopedic Surgery 26 years experience
Provided original answer
You will also need a preoperative medical evaluation to make sure you are safe for anesthesia. I also have all my patients get a dental check up to ensure there is no active gum or tooth infections that can infect your new knee replacment. If you are overweight, try your best to address your diet and activity to loss some weight and keep on that routine after surgery. Avoid gardening or activities that can scratch your skin prior to your surgery because your surgeon will cancel your surgery if you have open cuts or scrapes on your operative leg the day of surgery. Contact your insurance company to find out what therapy centers in your area accept your insurance for after surgery and which rehab facilities you can go to after surgery if you do not go right home from the hospital.
Aug 16, 2012
A 39-year-old member asked:

What's first-degree ankle sprain?

2 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Eric Lullove
Podiatry 19 years experience
Tear of...: First degree sprain - is a tear of only a few fibers of the ligament (in this case, the anterior-tibial fibular ligament) the atfl. It's also known as a "strain" and caused from a rapid inversion injury of the ankle or "rolling" the ankle inside, such as stepping off a curb the wrong way.

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Last updated Jan 29, 2015
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