A 34-year-old member asked:
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how does one develop catatonic schizophrenia?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Mark Reynolds
32 years experience Psychiatry
Catatonia: Actually the state of catatonia, at least today, is more common in affective disorders rather than schizophrenia. Nobody really knows why someone develops catatonic schizophrenia or any of the other subtypes. Research indicates most forms of schizophrenia are caused by brain dysfunction; but we understand yet why that brain dysfunction occurs.
Answered on Oct 3, 2016
Dr. Susan Uhrich
35 years experience Psychiatry
Catatonic : Schizophrenia is one type of schizophrenia. We don't fully understand what causes this illness.
Answered on May 7, 2016
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