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A 37-year-old member asked:

what is giant papillary conjunctivitis?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Tal Raviv
Ophthalmology 26 years experience
Allergy to CL: Typically this reaction occurs in response to soft contact lens wear. It is an allergic response to the protein deposited into the contact lenses. The symptoms can be red eye, discharge, and foreign body sensation after removing of contacts. Treatment can be with discontinuing contact lens wear and eyedrops. Daily disposable contacts are good for those prone to this condition.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Get treatment: This is a descriptive term for swelling and papule formation under the upper lid. Usually it is due to contact lens wear and the use of cleaning solutions. It is a type of hyperallergic response. It can be due to allergen contact from the environment. You may have to discontinue your contacts for a while. See your ophthalmologist to confirm the diagnosis and start proper treatment.

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A 37-year-old member asked:

When should my giant papillary conjunctivitis be gone?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Yash Khanna
Family Medicine 57 years experience
GIANTPAPILARY CONJUC: First you need to be sure it is gpc, if the diagnosis is correct, than do not wear any contact lenses till it clears in approx 2to 4 weeks.You can be prescribed mast cell stabilisers likecromoglicic acid or ketotifen, or antihistamine drops like patanol, (olopatadine) alaway, zaditor etc.Some times steroids for severe cases only, oral antihistamines can be used with the drops.
A 45-year-old member asked:

Can you swim if giant papillary conjunctivitis?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Robert Alexander
Plastic Surgery 27 years experience
Should be seen: Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a common complication of contact lens wear. You should see an opthalmologist prior to doing any swimming. Hard contact wearers have more problems that soft lenses. It is possibly caused by allergic like reaction on the inside of the upper lid more than lower.
A 38-year-old member asked:

What is the treatment for giant papillary conjunctivitis?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Tim Conrad
Ophthalmology 34 years experience
Stop the contacts: Most cases of gpc are related to contact lens use; and stopping the contacts is the first step in getting this resolved. Anti-inflammatory drops from your ophthalmologist will also help.
A 42-year-old member asked:

What is a giant papillary conjunctivitis (gpc)?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Larry Lutwick
Infectious Disease 49 years experience
A process: That is generally related to contact lenses.
A 35-year-old member asked:

What are the giant papillary conjunctivitis treatments?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Tim Conrad
Ophthalmology 34 years experience
The treatment: Is usually topical antihistamines and steroids, and discontinuation of the cause, often contact lenses.

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Last updated Mar 20, 2015
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