U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 45-year-old member asked:

How are reactions to poison ivy/oak/sumac treated?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Fisher
Dermatology 33 years experience
Poison ivy: Poison ivy treatments are usually limited to self-care methods, and the rash typically goes away on its own within two to four weeks. In the meantime, you can use poison ivy remedies, such as oatmeal baths and cool compresses, as well as over-the-counter anti-itch medications to relieve your signs and symptoms. In severe cases topical and oral cortisone are used.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Similar questions

A 39-year-old member asked:

Can you suggest any remedies for poison ivy, oak, sumac?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vicki Levine
Dermatology 42 years experience
How bad is it?: If it is not severe calamine lotion may help. You can also buy an over the counter antihistamine to help with the itching. Make sure you wash any clothing or shoes that you were wearing when you got the poison ivy since they may still transmit it to you. If you are very uncomfortable i would see a dermatologist.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 37-year-old member asked:

Can reactions to poison ivy, oak, and sumac be prevented?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 32 years experience
Depends on stage: Treatment for contact to the poison ivy or poison oak plant depends on the stage of exposure. If the rash is present, a doctor can prescribe steroids and antihistamines. If the exposure is recent and pre-symptoms, washing with tecnu helps remove urushiol, the oil from the poison ivy and poison oak plants that cause the blisters, itching, and pain. See your doctor and don't rub your eyes!
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 43-year-old member asked:

What will help treat poison ivy, oak, or sumac?

2 doctor answers1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Fisher
Dermatology 33 years experience
Poison ivy: Poison ivy treatments are usually limited to self-care methods, and the rash typically goes away on its own within two to four weeks. In the meantime, you can use poison ivy remedies, such as oatmeal baths and cool compresses, as well as over-the-counter anti-itch medications to relieve your signs and symptoms. In severe cases topical and oral cortisone is needed.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 40-year-old member asked:

Could i put rubbing alcohol on poison ivy/sumac/oak?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Ryan Phasouk
Family Medicine 19 years experience
Ill advised: It is not recommended to use rubbing alcohol on poison ivy/sumac/oak as this does not help clear the rash up and can cause pain/irritation of the affected skin.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Washington, MO
A 42-year-old female asked:

Can you use triamcinoione acetonide to for poison ivy oak and poison sumac?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Danielle DeHoratius
Dermatology 20 years experience
Yes, see below: It comes in a few strengths which is usually in percentage format. You would want to be cautious using the stronger one (.1) in certain locations. In addition you would not want to use them for an extended period because of the side effects such as thinning skin.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Related questions

A 34-year-old member asked:
And which take the longest to go away poison ivy, poison oak, or sumac?
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
A 37-year-old member asked:
How can you tell the difference between poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac?
3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Last updated Oct 3, 2016
Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.