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A 44-year-old member asked:

can you get air embolism from air in vagina?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Leto Quarles
Family Medicine 23 years experience
No.: That's an old wives' tale. An air embolism is caused by large amounts of air getting directly into the bloodstream, which cannot happen through the vagina.
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine 41 years experience
Very rarely: Dr. Quarles is right to say that the concern about air embolism from the vagina is greatly overblown, and there is more legend that fact. However, strong air pressure developing in the vagina during late pregnancy does pose a hazard, and rarely, fatal and near fatal cases have occurred, from orogenital sex or any source of air pressure in the vagina. See <a href="<a href="<a href="<a href="http.

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A 29-year-old member asked:

Air embolism from air in vagina. Is that a one in a million occurrence or rarer?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Sinclair
Family Medicine 38 years experience
It is rare: But it tends to be more common during pregnancy. It typically happens during oral sex where your partner tries to blow air into your vagina to expand it. Avoid doing that during pregnancy.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2016

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