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A 33-year-old member asked:

how do you get a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jason Adler
Pediatric Critical Care 24 years experience
Cardiomyopathy: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (hcm) is a genetically inherited disease. It is inherited in a fashion such that any child of an individual with hcm should be screened for this condition and should see a cardiologist.
Dr. Barton Cook
Pediatric Cardiology 31 years experience
From your parent: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic (inherited) condition.
Dr. Steven Neish
Pediatric Cardiology 38 years experience
Genetic defect: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is caused by a mutation in one of several genes that codes for cardiac contractile proteins (sarcomeric proteins.) typically, these are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. Spontaneous mutations do occur. Over 50% of people have an affected parent, but disease expression is variable.

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A 35-year-old member asked:

Can you describe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Milunski
Cardiology 37 years experience
HCM: Hcm is an abnormal thickening usually of the wall (septum) that divides the right and left ventricle. This thickening occurs in the absence of other diseases known to cause thickening of the heart muscle. It is relatively uncommon but occurs in a familial/hereditary form more than 50% of the time. Therefore, siblings and children of patients with hcm should be screened for it.
A 40-year-old member asked:

What people are affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Milunski
Cardiology 37 years experience
HCM: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy doesn't occur in any particular frequency in one group of people over another. It is relatively uncommon, being seen in about 1 in 500 people in the general population. However, it occurs in a hereditary form more than 50% of the time and therefore relatives of people with this disease should be screened for it.
A 35-year-old member asked:

Why is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy dangerous?

3 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Scott
Pediatric Cardiology 39 years experience
Risk of death: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death among young athletes. Further, individuals with this condition are at risk for sudden death even if they do not participate in sports.
A 39-year-old member asked:

Should I get myself tested for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Zevitz
Internal medicine 37 years experience
Not necessarily: Only if you have a family history of a relative who has suffered from sudden cardiac death, or you yourself have a heart murmur, or been diagnosed with heart failure or a significant cardiac rhythm disturbance do you need to be tested for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
A 43-year-old member asked:

Please tell me, could i get hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Neish
Pediatric Cardiology 38 years experience
Not acquired: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is caused by mutations of the proteins that make up the contractile apparatus of the heart, in general. That means it is not something you "get." generally, if you have the genetic makeup to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, you should have evidence (abnormal echocardiogram) by 43 years of age, so if you have a normal echocardiogram you aren't going to develop hcm.

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Last updated Jul 21, 2014

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