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A 28-year-old female asked:

what should i expect when one stops taking the birth control pill after being on it for a year and a half?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jane Van Dis
Obstetrics and Gynecology 18 years experience
Sometimes nothing: Sometimes when women stop taking they don't notice anything. Sometimes they might notice 1) changes in breast size or texture; 2) lengthening of their period, heavier periods; 3) increased sex drive (or decreased if you're afraid of getting pregnant); 4) changes in chair texture or amount; 5) weight gain or loss. Those are just a few of the more common ones. You may have some or none. Goodluck.

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Similar questions

A 50-year-old member asked:

I forgot to take my birth control pill yesterday. Should I take two pills today?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Raj Syal
Dr. Raj Syalanswered
Obstetrics and Gynecology 33 years experience
Yes: Yes, but use additional form of contraception this month. You may have breakthough bleeding.
A 44-year-old member asked:

How do I choose what birth control pill is right for me?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Trial and error: Birth control pills are like cars. The nuts and bolts of how they run is pretty much the same. However some people love on make of car and hate another which is just a personal preference.
A 34-year-old member asked:

What are the disadvantages of the birth control pill?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Sunyecz
Obstetrics and Gynecology 29 years experience
Irrregular bleeding: While acclimating to the pill, many women will have irregular bleeding. Also, compliance with the pill is necessary to ensure effectiveness. Rare side effects, such as blood clots, heart attack and stroke are rare in most healthy individuals, but need to be reviewed with all patients, including symptoms to look for, etc.
A 31-year-old member asked:

What are the disadvantages, if any, to taking the continuous or extended dose birth control pill?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lisa Jackson-moore
Obstetrics and Gynecology 28 years experience
Usually advantageous: Continous oral contraceptive use is associated with less bleeding over time than 21/7 oc regimens. Other noncontraceptive benefits include less pms-like symptoms i.e., pain and bloating. Women who suffer with menstrual migraines may have less frequent headaches. A continuous or extended oc regimen is ideal for women who have prolonged menses as well.
A 31-year-old member asked:

Why would a person want to take a continuous or extended dose birth control pill?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Chudacoff
Obstetrics and Gynecology 32 years experience
To avoid menses: The 'period' you have on birth control pills or NuvaRing is a chemical period, because the Progesterone and estrogen are removed. It is not a 'real' period. The Progesterone does not allow the lining to thicken, hence preventing uterine cancer. There is no reason to have a period on birth control pills, unless they are specifically used for cycle control.

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Last updated Aug 12, 2018

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