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A 50-year-old member asked:

why do antibiotics give me diarrhea?

4 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Crespin
Gastroenterology 28 years experience
Many reasons: Antibiotics can cause diarrhea because they kill the good bacterial flora in the colon. Some patients will take probiotics to help recolonize with good bacteria. However, antibiotics can also cause another bacteria clostridium difficile to grow. This bacteria can cause diarrhea on its own. If you develop increased abdominal pain or GI bleeding while on antibiotics, you should see a doctor.
Dr. Visalakshi Vallury
Family Medicine 24 years experience
Several reasons: Diarrhea can be a side effect of antibiotic treatment. Most commonly it is due to the fact that antibiotics not only kill the bacteria causing infection but they also kill the good bacteria in the colon that help in digestion of some foods. This can be a serious problem if there is abdominal pain, fever, or blood in the stool. See your doctor if the symptoms are more than mild.
Dr. Christian Assad
Cardiology 14 years experience
Cdiff: C. difficile is a disease-causing bacterium that can infect the large bowel and cause colitis. The intestinal tract of normal people contains millions of bacteria, referred to as the "normal flora,"Taking antibiotics can kill these "good" bacteria, allowing C. difficile to multiply and release toxins that damage the cells lining the intestine and cause ab pain and diarrhea.
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dentistry 40 years experience
Yes: In many instances, antibiotics can cause ibs.

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Similar questions

A member asked:

Can fruit juice cause my baby to have diarrhea? ?

8 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics 23 years experience
Yes: Certain fruit juices contain a non-digestible type of sugar called "sorbitol". Sorbitol causes the intestines to pull water in to dilute the sugar. This process causes loosening of the stools. Juices that are high in sorbitol are prune, apple, and pear juice. Most babies do not need juice for nutritional reasons when they are young, though small amounts may be recommended in cases of constipation.
A 32-year-old member asked:

Is diarrhea common in late pregnancy?

1 doctor answer5 doctors weighed in
Dr. R. Wayne Inzer
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
NO: No more common than for non-preganant. However, late in pregnancy, if carrying low, stools may need to be excessively soft to get past the babies head and this may be interpreted as diarrhea.
A 43-year-old member asked:

Is it safe to take medication for diarrhea while pregnant?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Amy Herold
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Yes: It is safe to take loperamid (immodium), but avoid bismuth-containing products like pepto-bismol, they contain salicylates which is an Aspirin compound and should be avoided during pregnancy.
A 41-year-old member asked:

Is it safe for to eat meat from livestock that were given antibiotics while pregnant?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Yes: It depends on what you are comparing it to.....Driving your car is riskier than eating meat from animals given antibiotics. However if you have the ability and the money to purchase meat from animals that were not given antibiotics and were fed appropriate food then i would say you should.
A 43-year-old member asked:

Can gassiness and loose stools with no other symptoms mean gluten problem?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Jennifer Frank
Family Medicine 22 years experience
Yes: Gluten sensitivy and allergy (celiac disease) can cause a host of problems including GI symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, bloating), rashes, headaches, blood in the stools, anemia, etc.

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Last updated May 11, 2019
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