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What foods should I avoid if I have hematomacrosis

A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott McLean
Clinical Genetics 36 years experience
Uncooked shellfish +: For each type of hemochromatosis (there are at least 3 types!), avoid uncooked fish shellfish from the ocean because you risk becoming ill (even fatal... Read More
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
Just get treated: Once the phlebotomies have begun, you have my permission to eat what you wish.

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A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
Family Medicine 24 years experience
Certainly: Red meats are known for iron content in them, so avoid those, avoid foods high in vitamin c, as it increases iron absorption. Foods high in sugar shou... Read More
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
Geriatrics 41 years experience
Iron /sugars: Hemochromatosis is a multisystem disorder of inappropriately increased dietary iron absorption and increased iron release from erythrophagocytosis. If... Read More
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
Not really: Once you've started your phlebotomy treatments, you have my permission to eat what you like, even iron-rich steak or Product 19. Diet won't save your ... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
Any: Any competent primary care physician can diagnose and arrange for treatment hemochromatosis. You may get sent to the gastroenterologist, cardiologist,... Read More
A 22-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shaym Puppala
Internal Medicine 26 years experience
It's in the genes: In hereditary (= inherited from parents) hemochromatosis, too much iron is absorbed by the gut & deposits in tissues. Liver, heart, other damage can r... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
Death if untreated: Thankfully, if it's picked up early, you're spared decades of ill-health and ultimately death from involvement of the heart, liver, and/or endocrine p... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
Absolutely: Thanks for your wanting to serve. Hemochromatosis is very common, and it is extremely easy to manage with phlebotomy. I'm hoping that it was diagosed ... Read More
A 45-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
Internal Medicine 28 years experience
Inherited: Inherited disorder of any one of a number of genes that are involved in iron transport and storage. The vast majority of hemochromatosis is type ! a ... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 50 years experience
Blood letting: Hemochromatosis can be easily managed by periodic removal of blood to drain the body of excess iron. This is about the only disease where the old prac... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
No: In fact, i urge my medical students to screen everybody for hemochromatosis as young adults. Congratulations on being diagnosed -- you've been spared ... Read More
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jason Hemming
Gastroenterology 18 years experience
Recessive (sort of): The common genetic defect in the hfe gene for phenotypic hemochromatosis is the c282y/c282y homozygous. However other defects other than c282y can lea... Read More