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torticollis

A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Rosenfeld
31 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
See below: Spasmodic torticollis (cervical dystonia) is a neurological condition which causes involuntary muscle spasms in the neck. The causes include disorders ... Read More
20
20 thanks

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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anthony LaBarbera
27 years experience Pediatrics
See below: Physical therapy will help treat the problem.
1
1 thank
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gregory Mosolf
24 years experience Pediatrics
Several ways: The head is tilted to one side and rotated to the opposite side. Common in newborn babies. Other causes include trauma/injury, tumor, infection, medic ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Samuel Gold
26 years experience Pediatrics
Neck spasm: It occurs when a group of neck muscles develops a spasm, causing them to contract and the neck not to move in all directions. It has different causes ... Read More
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1 comment
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8 thanks
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Goldie
47 years experience Pediatric Neurology
Twist of the neck: Torticollis just means twist of the neck. At birth a baby can be born with spasm of the neck muscles that causes the neck to twist to one side. Infl ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience Neurosurgery
Torticollis: Torticollis is due to a stiff or tight neck muscles. With toricollis comes a head tilt, if you do not have a head tilt you do not have torticollis.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anthony LaBarbera
27 years experience Pediatrics
See below: Physical exam. There are no specific tests.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Tepper
24 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Discomfort: Stiffness and pain in the neck with limited mobility of the neck.
3
3 thanks
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michele Arnold
21 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Dystonia: Spastic dystonia, localized dystonia, acquired dystonia.
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
57 years experience Neurology
Not really: Only real help comes from Botox injections.

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