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thyroid nuclear scan

A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Namey
48 years experience Rheumatology
None.: The amount of tc99m or iodine given is a small dose and does not pose a health risk for a radioactive thyroid scan.
Dr. Larry Wilf
34 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Always a risk: Your body/thyroid will recieve a tiny quantity of radiation exposure. Thats the risk. Have your md explain why he/she wants the test.
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Dr. Brian Wosnitzer
18 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Thyroid scan: I assume you are referring to a nuclear thyroid scan and uptake which is usually performed for thyroid nodule and or hyperthyroidism assessment. Yo ... Read More

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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Korona
33 years experience Interventional Radiology
See: Radiologyinfo.Org.
Dr. Guido Davidzon
18 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Varies: A thyroid uptake and scan may be done with different isotopes and protocols resulting in scan time variation. Typically is done with i-123; you take t ... Read More
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Philip Kern
43 years experience Endocrinology
Thyroid scan: This scan involves taking orally a small dose of radioactive iodine. The iodine is taken up by the thyroid and produces an image. "cold" areas are pla ... Read More
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Dr. Raymond Taillefer
42 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Thyroid imaging: A thyroid nuclear scan is an imaging study of the thyroid gland using radioiosotopes such as iodine 131, iodine 123, or 99mtc-pertechnetate. Following ... Read More
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Dr. Gerald Mandell
52 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Thyroid function: The patient ingests radioactive iodine or has intravenous injection of radiotracer technetium to define structure, size, and function of thyroid gland ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Namey
48 years experience Rheumatology
Low or high?: Low uptake could indicate hypothyroidism, while high uptake might indicate hyperthyroidism (grave's disease). The test (scan) you had would have als ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Namey
48 years experience Rheumatology
Not really.: The half-life of the tc99m used in most scans is such that you are radiation free in 24hrs. Also, the amount used is very small. Don't worry.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pradeep Singh
24 years experience Family Medicine
7days: Patient s should be on low iodine diet for one week before the the scan.
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4 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Korona
33 years experience Interventional Radiology
Check: Iodine content.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Orr
44 years experience Surgical Oncology
Regular salt is OK: Salt without iodine (if you can find it is ok). The scan requires a low iodine diet.
A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Crabbe
42 years experience Internal Medicine
Thyroid scan vs sono: The nuclear scan and the ultrasound of the thyroid are used for different reasons so one is not "better" than the other. The nuclear scan assesses the ... Read More
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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Orr
44 years experience Surgical Oncology
Test: Uses: hyperthyroid patients, following thyroid cancer, and as a prelude to receiving radioactive iodine to treat thyroid cancer. Should not be used ... Read More
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