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thinning of the aorta

A 84-year-old male asked:
Dr. Harinder Gill
38 years experience in Cardiology
Thinning aorta: No it is not normal

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A female asked:
Dr. Benjamin Lerner
18 years experience in Vascular Surgery
No such thing: A hernia is an abnormal protrusion of an organ through a defect -- this really can't happen with the aorta. An enlarged aorta may (incorrectly) be cal ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Xray: This is a chest xray appearance of a widening of the normal aortic arch curve in the superior thorax. It does not necessarily have pathologic import t ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
doesn't happen: Aortas don't get pinched. They can become aneurysmal, rupture, leak, become stenotic (develop "blockage"), tear, become infected, inflamed - but not p ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Aorta: The aortic diameter is related to genetics and blood pressure in most people. High blood pressure can cause the aorta to be larger as can some arteria ... Read More
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A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience in Cardiology
Hypertension: Intima disorders of sorta and bicuspid aortic valve ...May need a cardiology consult and echo.
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1 thank
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Stern
45 years experience in Cardiology
Congenital: It is a cogenital defect and is present in utero ( before birth).
A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Shayani
32 years experience in Cardiology
Many complications: Some of the complications that may occur are high blood pressure, rupture of the aorta, stroke, premature heart disease and weakening or bulging of ar ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Binford
37 years experience in Thoracic Surgery
Yes - sort of: These are terms for atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis. This disease causes the walls of blood vessels to thick and develop what we call plaques. E ... Read More
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1 thank
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Valves: Those are the aortic valve and the pulmonary valve.
A 61-year-old member asked:
Dr. Howard Rubin
46 years experience in Cardiology
Coarctation: It is congenital defect.
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Cardiomegaly: Cardiomegaly is a generic term for enlargement of the heart. It can be associated with dilation, hypertrophy and/or both.
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1 thank
A 67-year-old male asked:
Dr. Allan Goldstein
55 years experience in Internal Medicine
Vascular: Need regular follow up by cardiologist.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Veins: the arterial walls are thicker and have more muscle to accommodate the higher pressures in arteries than veins
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Freeman
17 years experience in Cardiology
Unequal BP: With a coarct or "pinching" of the aorta, you might have high blood pressure in the top of your body and low pressure in the lower part of your body. ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gopinath Upamaka
38 years experience in Cardiology
Aortic root: The initial part of the aorta arising from the heart is called the aortic root. Normal diameter is around 3 to 3.5 cms. Anything larger is dilated and ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Jost
35 years experience in Cardiology
LAD, Circ & RCA: The three major arteries of the heart are the left anterior descending, lad, the circumflex and the right coronary artery, rca.
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Other: Blood flows from higher pressure to lower pressure. Aorta higher, pa lower usually. Coarctation distal to PDA cause higher aortic pressure spikes wi ... Read More
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1 comment
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Wylie
20 years experience in Internal Medicine
1.5-2: 1.5 - 2 CM squared is a normal aortic valve area, though body size must be taken into account.
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19 thanks
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Frank Kuitems
38 years experience in Internal Medicine
Generally the lumen: Generally they're measuring the diameter the lumen
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1 thank
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Vorhies
24 years experience in Vascular Surgery
Several theories: Most common belief is that aneurysms develop due to some inherent weakness in the artery's muscular layer due to an imbalance of collagen metabolism o ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Christopher White
42 years experience in Cardiology
Pressure: The atrial are "low" pressure chambers and have thinner walls. The ventricles are "high" pressure chambers, to pump the blood out to the body and hav ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barton Cook
30 years experience in Pediatric Cardiology
Congenital defect: It is a narrowing of the aorta, the major blood vessel that branches off your heart and delivers blood to your body. It is usually congenital, and may ... Read More
2
2 thanks

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