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Temporary color blindness

A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Goldie
Pediatric Neurology 48 years experience
Too much sun?: The eyes have visual pigment that responds to color. Some are born with defective pigment and can not detect red or green. More common the pigment i... Read More

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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Lawrence Kale
Occupational Medicine 29 years experience
Rates: Occurrence is the number used to show how many new cases of something are diagnosed per year. Prevalence is the number of actual cases of the diagnose... Read More
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
About 8%: The standard statistics for inherited color deficiency is about 7.5% in males and 1/2 % in females. This can vary somewhat with different racial grou... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Rare: Color deficiency is inherited at birth. A few global diseases of the retina and rare strokes of the brain can affect color vision in an adult, but th... Read More
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Unusual: Color deficiency is an inherited condition. Some extremely rare strokes of the brain can affect color perception. Global disease of the retina can a... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics 46 years experience
Depends upon age: Obviously inability to distinguish between red / green colors. Some have trouble with blue/yellow. It does assume the child knows his colors. I am not... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Todd Purkiss
Ophthalmology 17 years experience
Testing: The most common type of "color blindness" is red-green color deficiency. Blue-yellow deficiency or true color blindness (achromatopsia) are rare. Colo... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Hector
Ophthalmology 9 years experience
No good: If you are progressively losing your ability to distinguish different colors at your young age, you need to seek medical attention. "normal" color bl... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Coden
Ophthalmology 37 years experience
Mostly congenital: Color blindness (actually color confision) is not uncommon, being present from birth in 6% of males and .6% of females. It can also be aquired rarely,... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Todd Purkiss
Ophthalmology 17 years experience
Varied: The most common type of "color blindness" is red-green color deficiency. Blue-yellow deficiency or true color blindness (achromatopsia) are rare. Colo... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Sort of: About 8% of males and 1% of females have some degree of color perception dysfunction. So it is sort of common but not the majority. It is inherited s... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Albert Pizzo
Family Medicine 60 years experience
Color blindness: Color blindness is the inability to see certain colors adequately. This is an inherited condition (x-linked recessive) that affects men much more tha... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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