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recurring poison oak

A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Glynis Ablon
28 years experience in Dermatology
Perhaps this is not: poison oak. There are other causes of blistering rashes. See dermatologist and perhaps get biopsy or viral culture of blisters.
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A 42-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tipu Sultan
Specializes in Allergy
Topical medicine : if it is not severe one can use over the counter hydrocortisone cream 1% as directed on the medicine. If it is severe you need to see a primary care p ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Field
Specializes in Pediatric Allergy and Asthma
Poison oak treatment: Generally the treatment of topical. Cleaning the scan and using antimicrobial soap such as die was important to prevent infection. I would start with ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Linda Green
44 years experience in Pediatric Allergy and Asthma
Contact dermatitis: Contact dermatitis from poison ivy, oak or sumac usually requires steroids, either topical steroid cream or oral steroids if more severe or widespread ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Brian Novick
42 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
Red bumps or lines->: Which may ooze some clear or slightly yellow fluid. I t probably looks the same as 'poison ivy'...Usually it occurs within a couple of days of being ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Paul Carter
29 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
Rash & Itch: Poison oak causes a rash where it contacts your skin and typically is very itchy.
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2 thanks
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wenjay Sung
13 years experience in Podiatry
Sweat: Sweat and heat could lead to further exposure and exacerbation and inflammation symptoms.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Machtinger
43 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
2-4 weeks: The longer you wait to treat effectively with corticosteroids, the longer it lasts.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Berger
40 years experience in Dermatology
Unlikely: Only way is if the oil is on skin or clothing and you touch the oil.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Steven
29 years experience in Pediatric Allergy and Asthma
Steroids: High-potency steroid creams are helpful in mild cases, but a more severe rash will require oral steroids (prednisone). Over the counter medications ar ... Read More
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