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Recurring poison oak

A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Glynis Ablon
Dermatology 29 years experience
Perhaps this is not: poison oak. There are other causes of blistering rashes. See dermatologist and perhaps get biopsy or viral culture of blisters.

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A 37-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tipu Sultan
Specializes in Allergy
Topical medicine : if it is not severe one can use over the counter hydrocortisone cream 1% as directed on the medicine. If it is severe you need to see a primary care p... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Field
Specializes in Pediatric Allergy and Asthma
Poison oak treatment: Generally the treatment of topical. Cleaning the scan and using antimicrobial soap such as die was important to prevent infection. I would start with ... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Linda Green
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 45 years experience
Contact dermatitis: Contact dermatitis from poison ivy, oak or sumac usually requires steroids, either topical steroid cream or oral steroids if more severe or widespread... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Paul Carter
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Rash & Itch: Poison oak causes a rash where it contacts your skin and typically is very itchy.
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wenjay Sung
Podiatry 14 years experience
Sweat: Sweat and heat could lead to further exposure and exacerbation and inflammation symptoms.
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Machtinger
Allergy and Immunology 44 years experience
2-4 weeks: The longer you wait to treat effectively with corticosteroids, the longer it lasts.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Berger
Dermatology 41 years experience
Unlikely: Only way is if the oil is on skin or clothing and you touch the oil.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Steven
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 30 years experience
Steroids: High-potency steroid creams are helpful in mild cases, but a more severe rash will require oral steroids (prednisone). Over the counter medications ar... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ryan Phasouk
Family Medicine 18 years experience
Duration: Poison oak symptoms can take anywhere from 1-3 weeks to resolve without treatment.

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