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normal oxygen saturation levels during sleep

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Patrick Melder
26 years experience in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Lack of oxygen: When you stop breathing (apnea) oxygen and carbon dioxide do not exchange in the lungs. Oxygen drops (hypoxia) and co2 increase (hypercapnia)... Class ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ranji Varghese
16 years experience in Sleep Medicine
It all depends: Without knowing a detailed medical history to determine if "low" oxygen may be a chronic, well compensated issue, it is impossible to answer. Typical ... Read More
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A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience in Neurology
Right on the brink: Typically, O2 sats while asleep in a healthy individual should be >90. If yours are typically hitting 90 or below then, I'd say you are right in th ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Christopher Abel
25 years experience in Pediatrics
Depends: Av canal defects are a cluster of seperate defects. The oxygen saturation would depend on which defect is present and to what degree.
A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. William Walsh
16 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Varies: If the heart is still beating and the patients lungs haven't filled with edema, the saturation s can be normal near the heart... But if there is no fo ... Read More
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A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gregg Vagner
23 years experience in Hand Surgery
Close to 100: The closer to 100, the better. Most consider optimal above 92.
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A 42-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Dugan
Specializes in Hematology
Yes: Menstruation is blood loss, so anything but the lightest of cycles will cause the HGB to go down.
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
21 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Above 90%: Normally, oxygen saturation should stay above 90% during sleep.
A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Aaron Milstone
26 years experience in Pulmonology
Yes: Your oxygen level when you sleep should be above 88%. Anything lower than this can increase your risk of irregular heart beat, myocardial infarction ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
It can: Sepsis can cause acute inflammation and swelling in the lungs making it harder to breathe, and causing oxygen levels to drop. Compromised heart and ki ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sanjay Agarwal
25 years experience in Pulmonology
No: In general, it does not. If it happens in your case, please seek help.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience in Family Medicine
Greater than 96%: Greater than 96% on room air.
A 71-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rashed Hasan
30 years experience in Pediatrics
Sleep apnea: One of the features of sleep apnea is that the oxygen level and hemoglobin-oxygen saturation (the amount of oxygen carried in the blood to the tissues ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nestor Del rosario
33 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Oxygen sat curve: If you look at the p50 or oxygen saturation curve, anything above 90% is ok for the hemoglobin to unload as it gets into the tissues and supply them. ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rada Ivanov
30 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Yes: Sepsis can cause acute lung injury (ali) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) which are both reactions of the lung to the toxins and cytokin ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
High is good.: Well you would anticipate 95 to 100% oxygen saturation for a young healthy adult. The lower the oxygen saturation the more concern.
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A 73-year-old male asked:
Dr. Marsha Davis
27 years experience in Internal Medicine
It is fine: As long as it does not drop below 90% it is ok. You do not say what your health problems are or if you were a smoker. But it sounds like you are ok.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Goldberg
Specializes in Gastroenterology
Breath rate increase: O2 deprivation will typically cause people to breath faster. Abg measures levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide and blood ph. Faster breathing causes a dro ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience in Pediatrics
It happends: Bronchiolitis causes a build up of secretions in the tiny airways and blocks transfer of oxygen into the tissues. It can and does cause a drop in bloo ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nestor Del rosario
33 years experience in Addiction Medicine
O2 goes into lung: Traverse the interstitial to the blood vessel wall to the blood cells goes to tissues and be delivered. Normal saturation therefore depends on the oxy ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Faisal Qureshi
27 years experience in Pediatric Surgery
Normal: I believe you are talking about newborns with a pectus who is on the ventilator. If this is the case, the saturation should be normal 99%, unless ther ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matthew Majzun
13 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Depends on cause...: Most often, this is related to obstructive sleep apnea. This is when your airway becomes "floppy" while sleeping. The airway closes and no air can p ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alexander Bankov
36 years experience in Anesthesiology
Not quite: Oxygen saturation reflects the proportion of red blood cell pigment - hemoglobin that is loaded ("saturated") with oxygen. It is unitless and shown as ... Read More
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