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myasthenia gravis signs

A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Rosenfeld
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
See below: If you go to this website, it will answer your questions in a more complete fashion than i can do here. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matthew Kozminski
16 years experience Neurology
Visual: Start out with double vision, droopy eyelids, and may just feel weak. A good evaluation from a neurologist is starting point if this is your concern.
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Marisa Johnson
Specializes in Nephrology and Dialysis
Maybe: An rns study is considered positive if the decrement is > 10% but a decremental response is not specific for myasthenia gravis. Decrements may be s ... Read More
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1 thank
Dr. Bennett Machanic
52 years experience Neurology
Not necessarily: Really require more than one area of decrement, and even so, nonspecific as can be seen with metabolic problems, muscle disease, neuropathies, and eve ... Read More
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1 thank
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Fisher
34 years experience Neurology
Probably not, but...: ...the term "dysfunction" is so nonspecific that it provides no useful information. Please repost and clarify what you mean by "dysfunction."
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1 thank
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
57 years experience Allergy and Immunology
See rheuma: I strongly recommend that you consult a rheumatologist to get your disease condition undercontrolled. I don't see why both conditions cannot be impro ... Read More
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1 thank
A 16-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
41 years experience Internal Medicine
Carefully: This question is not well studied - there is an ongoing investigation of the benefits of exercise in MG (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles ... Read More
A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. Julian Bragg
17 years experience Neurology
Fatigable weakness: Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that disrupts the neuromuscular junction, so that when motor nerves fire the muscle fibers do not reliably ... Read More
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13 thanks
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
52 years experience Neurology
Autoimmune: We have discovered that the connection between nerve and muscle is compromised by injury to the neuromuscular junction by an antibody that affects ace ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 53-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald McCarren
36 years experience Neurology
Unknown: In most cases, myasthenia gravis is not inherited and occurs in people with no history of the disorder in their family. About 3 to 5 percent of af ... Read More
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Olav Jaren
19 years experience Neurology
Not very common: Myasthenia gravis is not a very common illness. Of every 10000 people, you may be able identify about 1-2. There are several thousand cases in the U ... Read More
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1 thank

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