Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

medicine for hereditary breast cancer

A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Stern
9 years experience General Surgery
Breast cancer: Unfortunately yes. Many cancers arise from single cells that become cancerous through a series of unfortunate mutations. Hereditary breast cancers ar ... Read More
Dr. Regina Hampton
22 years experience Breast Surgery
Very high: The risk of developing breast cancer when a brca gene is present is between 80-90%. The risk of developing a 2nd breast cancer is 60-70%. This is th ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Rosen
33 years experience General Surgery
Yes: Matched stage-for-stage, the response rate to treatment is no different for the hereditary or non-hereditary forms of breast cancer. The main differe ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sean Canale
29 years experience Breast Surgery
Exception not rule: Most breast cancer diagnoses are not "hereditary". The currently identified mutations (brca 1/2) account for only ~ 10-15% of newly diagnosed breast c ... Read More
Dr. Steven Tucker
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Meet an expert: I can't do justice to your question in 400 characters. Check out these great links on breast cancer. http://1.usa.gov/nmutde / http://1.Usa.Gov/n ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Rosen
33 years experience General Surgery
BRCA POSITIVE: As many as 10-15% of breast cancers in the us are believed to be hereditary. These are linked to mutations of a particular group of genes called the ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Regina Hampton
22 years experience Breast Surgery
BRCA: To determine if you have a hereditary breast cancer, a complete history needs to be obtained. Based on this history and a mapping of your family's ca ... Read More
1
1 comment
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Same as regular: Breast cancer. Only about 3% of the breast cancers are due to inherited defects and these cancers have the same symptoms as regular/sporadic cancer, ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
36 years experience Hematology and Oncology
History/blood test: The first step is to get a family history. If the history suggests a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer, blood testing to evaluate for brca1 ... Read More
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dariush Vaziri
46 years experience Breast Surgery
Due to abnormal Gene: Some cancers are secondary to abnormal genetic predisposition. Most commonly called BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes. People who carry these abnormalities have ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience Radiation Oncology
Certain genetic: Risks, brca 1 & 2, are known, other are not, but familial clusters (mother, aunt sister) point to risk but the actual cause and function of the geneti ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience Radiation Oncology
Prevention: Implies "fixing the underlying defect" and this sort of genetic engineering has not arrived - vectoring the gene in may not lead to its propoer regula ... Read More
1
1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month