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legal blindness signs

A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
Depends: Legal blindness has several definitions with some variation depending upon the state and the agency in question. Generally a corrected vision of 20/2 ... Read More
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Dr. Ronald Holzman
46 years experience Mammography, Breast Ultrasound
See below. : A person is considered to be legally blind if he or she has a best corrected vision of 20/200 in their best seeing eye. If an individual has a visual ... Read More

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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
A few: If you are legally blind you will develop your other senses better. You will make different and sometimes interesting friends and most will appreciat ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Leto Quarles
22 years experience Family Medicine
20/200 corrected: For most purposes, a person is considered "legally blind' if the best they are able to see with all corrective assistance (glasses, etc.) is 20/200, w ... Read More
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
20/200: Legal blindness varies with the jurisdiction but the two most common discriminators are a best corrected acuity of 20/200 in the best eye and/or a vis ... Read More
Dr. Ronald Holzman
46 years experience Mammography, Breast Ultrasound
See below. : A person is considered to be legally blind if he or she has a best corrected vision of 20/200 in their best seeing eye. If an individual has a visual ... Read More
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience Ophthalmology
See below.: This is a legal, not medical, term. A typical definition is visual acuity that is 20/200 or less in the best eye that has the best possible glass ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Neil Notaroberto
28 years experience Ophthalmology
Broad question: There are several treatments for legal blindness dependent on the cause. If it is due to corneal disease, then risks are low. If due to retinal etiolo ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Fred Orlando
35 years experience Ophthalmology
Varied: Vision loss can present in a # of ways. Difficulty at night can be an early sign. Loss of central vision gives trouble reading and recognizing faces. ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
45 years experience Pediatrics
Depends upon age: Obviously inability to distinguish between red / green colors. Some have trouble with blue/yellow. It does assume the child knows his colors. I am not ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
Generally teen years: The color vision of someone with color deficiency is natural to them until they start to compare their color vision with others. This can occur in la ... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Chandler
32 years experience Ophthalmology
Get an eye exam: The term "blindness" can be interpreted in many different ways. Central vision can be impaired by a simple need for glasses, and the problem can be ea ... Read More
A 19-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Floaters: Most floaters are caused by small flecks of protein called Collagen. Some causes can be injury to eye, high sugar in blood, aura of migraine headaches ... Read More
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