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lazy eye

A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Non-working = lazy: Lazy eye refers to several issues that can cause the brain to quit accepting input from an affected eye, so it is not working =lazy. Example: 1 eye p ... Read More
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Dr. Lisa Abrams
29 years experience Pediatric Ophthalmology
Genetics: Most lazy eye (amblyopia) is inherited--not directly from the parents often but other family members may have it. Children with a family history of am ... Read More

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A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Oscar Novick
57 years experience Pediatrics
Lazy eye: If not treated a lazy eye can get worse
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1 thank
Dr. Aarthi Vinca
16 years experience Ophthalmology
Yes: Lazy eye can get worse. Depending on the source, age of person, and level of vision in the lazy eye, various treatments can be helpful. This can inclu ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Rx May help: Ambliopia is the process where the brain ignores the "camera" picture from one eye because it is less clear or causes double vision. It can sometimes ... Read More
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Dr. Daniel Pierre
13 years experience Pediatric Ophthalmology
It depends.: Lazy eye, or amblyopia, refers to poor development of the relationship of the brain with one or both eyes. It can be associated with a misaligned eye, ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 25-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Ann Block
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Lack of binocularity: When your 2 eyes don't work together to make one picture, you see double. So your brain stops 1 eye from working so the good eye an see one picture. T ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Noha Ekdawi
15 years experience Ophthalmology
It really depends: It depends on the cause and on age. You need to schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist nearby.
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12 thanks
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sarah Helfand
36 years experience Pediatrics
Yes.: First of all, it depends on the age of the patient. Possible solutions include glasses, patching, or surgery. Talk to your ophthalmologist (not opto ... Read More
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16 thanks
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dean Bonsall
26 years experience Pediatric Ophthalmology
Yes: Yes.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience Ophthalmology
No treatment: There is no effective treatment for a lazy eye in an adult.
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1 thank
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
57 years experience Neurology
Obviously!: Lazy eye is the term reserved for diminution or loss of vision due to not using an eye this usually due to strabismus not corrected in the first 18 m ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Goldstein
30 years experience Ophthalmology
Full exam: Patching, glasses and/or surgery can help. A full exam for lazy eye includes looking for signs of and causes of lazy eye. These include a big differen ... Read More

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