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Infarction

A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the ant ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the ant ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the ant ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Isaacs
38 years experience in Family Medicine
Inferior MI: Old (ie, completed and not acute) myocardial infarctions may be detected by ecg's. Some of the ECG (ekg) leads record electrical activity in the ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Asaf Presente
15 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Many poss causes: Almost all heart attacks are the result of fatty deposits on the inside of arteries that break open and cause clotting which will blocks the artery (a ... Read More
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12 thanks
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Asaf Presente
15 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
See a doctor: Anyone who has had a heart attack/mi should be under the care of a physician who can evaluate their risks, cardiac status and prescribe the appropriat ... Read More
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6 thanks
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Lin
Dr. James Lin answered
50 years experience in Urology
Here are some...: A 400-letter space is impossible to address many indicated subjects as questioned here. Why not type in the terms as keywords to search online? Thereb ... Read More
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Testing: History can be suggestive but : ekg changes( st elevation) nonstemi blood tests showing escaping enzymes from damaged cells later ekg showi ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Stern
45 years experience in Cardiology
A new heart attack: A new heart attack occurs when some heart muscle loses its oxygen supply and dies.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Irv Loh
Dr. Irv Loh answered
48 years experience in Cardiology
Continuum: Both are a result of inadequate blood supply to the heart muscle. Acute coronary syndrome means that the imbalance is sufficient to cause symptoms th ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Landers
30 years experience in Cardiac Electrophysiology
Ischemia vs MI: Cholesterol plaque develops in the heart arteries. Progressive narrowing - usually greater than 70% - can lead to lack of blood flow to the heart musc ... Read More
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A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience in Cardiology
Yes and no: Well if you truly had a myocardial infarction, some of the heart muscle has been damaged and that is not curable. But you may do well if it is just a ... Read More
A 55-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
MI: MI is the medical term that people commonly call "a heart attack". It is injury and cellular death of heart muscle tissue due to lack of circulation.
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Yash Khanna
56 years experience in Family Medicine
SAME: Myocardial infarction and acute myocardial infarction are the same name for commonly known as heart attack.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Borookhim
24 years experience in Geriatrics
No its not common : But is a real complication.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Asaf Presente
15 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Many poss causes: An inferior mi refers to a heart attack on the inferior wall of the heart muscle. Almost all heart attacks are the result of fatty deposits on the in ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Camacho
23 years experience in Family Medicine
Pericardial effusion: A large pericardial effusion causes a condition called pericardial tamponade, wherein the pressure is so great it prevents the heart from beating effe ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Roth
39 years experience in Hospital-based practice
A heart attack : The septum is the wall that separates the right from the left side of the heart. Myocardial infarction, a heart attack, is caused by a blocked artery ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Atherosclerosis: Most myocardial infarctions are associated with atherosclerotic disease
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Garner
15 years experience in Cardiology
the same thing: Arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease means blockages in the coronary arteries. The manifestation of coronary artery blockage is a heart attack. Wh ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Freeman
17 years experience in Cardiology
Not really: Tia or transient ischemic attack is essential a stroke that resolves quickly ... As such it is cerebrovascular disease which is part of the cardiovasc ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Christopher White
42 years experience in Cardiology
Big heart attack: Stemi is term for a large and dangerous kind of heart attack. It usually requires emergency treatment with clot buster medications or a stent.
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3 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
43 years experience in Internal Medicine
Cv words: These all refer to cardiovascular particulars. Pectoris = Chest. Atherosclerosis = vascular wall scarring from cholesterol deposit. Coronary artery di ... Read More
1
1 thank

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