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how to swim with a stress fracture

A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Tepper
25 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Injury to the bone: Bone is constantly being broken down and re-built. With repetitive activity, it may break down more than it repairs itself resulting in a fracture of ... Read More
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9 thanks
Dr. Darrell Latva
42 years experience Podiatry
STRESS FX: This results from repetitive, excessive load on a bone, resulting in micro fractures, a stress reaction to the bone, and finally, a stress fx.

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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Sider
39 years experience Sports Medicine
A fracture w/o injur: A stress fracture is typically a fracture due to repetitive activity and stress but not due to an injury these injuries are often secondary to running ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
49 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Load beyond capacity: If weight bearing bones are loaded beyond what their capacity is to handle the force, the bone will break down and become injured and cause stress fra ... Read More
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2 thanks
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
35 years experience Hand Surgery
Exam and imaging: Stress fractures may be hard to see on standard x-rays and additional studies such as bone scan or MRI may be helpful. A careful history and exam is a ... Read More
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1 thank
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
35 years experience Hand Surgery
Exam and imaging: A stress fracture is a fracture but stress fractures may be hard to see on standard x-rays and additional studies such as bone scan or MRI may be help ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
49 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Fracture of vertebra: The pars stress fracture (spondylolysis) usually occurs in the lower back (lumbar spine) and results from repetitive hyperextension (bending backwards ... Read More
A 19-year-old female asked:
Dr. Scott Keith
44 years experience Podiatry
Stop Stressing.: Healing stress fractures is accomplished, for the most part, by simply reducing weight bearing (i.e. stress) to the involved bone. The remedy may inv ... Read More
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1 comment
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Tepper
25 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Xray: An xray may show a fracture. If not, and there is a high clinical suspicion, an MRI or nuclear bone scan can be helpful.
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5 thanks
A 55-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bruce J. Stringer
47 years experience Radiology
Remove Stress: A stress fracture is an overuse injury of the bone, typically a long bone of the legs or a foot bone resulting from increased stress on the bone that ... Read More
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1 thank
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bertrand Kaper
29 years experience Orthopedic Reconstructive Surgery
Overuse: Stress fractures are the result of repetitive micro trauma to a bone from overuse. This is typically seen in individuals who start on a very vigorous ... Read More
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1 thank
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
32 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Exam, X-ray and MRI: An thorough examination starting with a detailed history will uncover most stress fractures. Patients complain of pain directly over the area of injur ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Hellman
29 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Yes: A stress fracture is in fact a "break" in the bone and so all stress fractures are "breaks" in the bone already. Thank you.
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1 thank

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