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Frostbite

A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Ihle
53 years experience in Orthopedic Surgery
Yes but nut fully : With proper rx it will heal depending on the degree of the burn. 1st no problem, rx like a sunburn. 2 with blisters keep clean don't pop them. Shower ... Read More
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A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mike Bowman
18 years experience in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Injury to be managed: Frostbite happens when the body part affected gets frozen. Your body has to heal up from the injury. If the frostbite is mild, prognosis is very goo ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mike Bowman
18 years experience in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Frostbite=freezing: Frostbite is a real risk whenever people spend time outdoors in freezing temperatures. It occurs when tissue of the body freezes. An ounce of preven ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
34 years experience in Hand Surgery
Frostbite: Redness and swelling and pain. Get evaluated keep away from extreme temperature even heat, keep clean consider topical antibiotics and avoid repeat e ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Tuckman
22 years experience in Hand Surgery
Cell Death: Frost bite is a condition where the tissue freezes. This causes ice crystals within the cells which ruptures the cells causing death of the tissue. It ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Brown
38 years experience in Hand Surgery
Yes: Blistering or bulle are a typical part of the presentation of frostbite.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
34 years experience in Hand Surgery
Frostbite: turns black for deeper more severe injuries. Mild frostbite may not show any change but feel different or numb. Redness or blistering represents more ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Press
43 years experience in Plastic Surgery
Can take a long time: Frostbite injuries can heal very slowly. Often the final amount of tissue lost is less that one would predict initially. The general rule is: "injured ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joseph Eastern
43 years experience in Dermatology
Not good.: See doctor. Get treated.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Saunders
42 years experience in Internal Medicine
Frostbite: Possibly.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Clark Schierle
17 years experience in Plastic Surgery
Frostbite pigmenatio: Possibly. Any time skin is injured, it can affect the function of the melanocytes or cells responsible for pigmenting the skin. Speeding recovery with ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Raymond Wittstadt
35 years experience in Hand Surgery
Pain: Frostbite occurs with prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. It doesn't have to be freezing outside to get it. First fingers, toes feel cold, then ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
34 years experience in Hand Surgery
Frostbite: Redness and swelling and pain. , keep clean consider topical antibiotics and avoid repeat exposure to cold. Seek medical attention...See the picture ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Otto Placik
33 years experience in Plastic Surgery
Depends on severity: Frostbite requires observation because it can be extremely difficult to determine the extent of the injury. Initially the injury can produce profound ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Jason
22 years experience in Podiatry
Possibly: There are numerous reasons for numbness in feet. If its both feet it could be a result of neuropathy, which can be caused by diabetes, vitamin b-12 de ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Astrachan
36 years experience in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Yes: Ice in the first 48 hours is very helpful for nasal trauma.
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A 56-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gopinath Upamaka
38 years experience in Cardiology
Dilate: Nifedipine is a vasodilator calcium channel blocker. Helps dilate the vessels and might help with raynauds.
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A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ipe Kalathoor
16 years experience in Internal Medicine
Ray aids: If bothering very much, talk to your doctor. A group of medications called calcium channel blockers can be of help.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Orrin Ailloni-Charas
28 years experience in Anesthesiology
If you get : Frostbite, you can do permanent damage to your nerves.
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience in Podiatry
Frostbite: Is frostbite. The question is do you have it or not? Did your fingers blister? Change color? Or is it you simply held the ice pack and felt cold?
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael McGonigal
38 years experience in General Surgery
Cold then heat: Most sports medicine experts recommend cold first, because it decreases swelling and pain. Then later, heat frequently provides more relief. However, ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dean Giannone
24 years experience in Internal Medicine
Fire.: The word "thermal" implies temperature, i.e. heat.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
34 years experience in Hand Surgery
Frostbite: Redness and swelling and pain. Get evaluated keep away from extreme temperature even heat, keep clean consider topical antibiotics and avoid repeat e ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience in Orthopedic Surgery
Right away: When holding dry ice, how long does it take for the ice to cause frostbite?
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
Yes: The treatment for heat exhaustion or its more serious next stage, heat stroke, is rapid cooling. Immersion in ice water is an effective treatment.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Brown
38 years experience in Hand Surgery
Conservative: Allow tissues to heal without debridement unless an infection should develop. Keep clean and use antibiotic ointment.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Dunbar
27 years experience in Orthopedic Surgery
Blood flow: Using ice or other cold therapy after an injury helps to decrease the blood flow to the area which helps to decrease the amount of swelling and may du ... Read More
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A 56-year-old female asked:
Dr. Tracy Lovell
20 years experience in Rheumatology
Difficult to say: You may have raynauds with some type of inflammatory arhritis based on the limited information provided. See your doctor for further evlaution.
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Otto Placik
33 years experience in Plastic Surgery
Rewarming & observe: Frostbite injury is very conservative with gentle rewarming and observation. If necrotic tissue occurs removal is advised after the tissue has clearly ... Read More
A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience in Ophthalmology
Yes: As with a cast, skin can peel if it has been wrapped continuously. Normally, the skin sheds a little at a time. With a continuous cover, that doesn't ... Read More
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A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr. Joseph Newman
31 years experience in Podiatry
See a doctor: Seek treatment from your doctor as soon as possible.
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A 27-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jerome Litt
70 years experience in Dermatology
FROSTBITE: Frostbite is the sharp, painful sensations that result from the freezing & thawing of the skin. It is a severe cold injury. The areas of the body most ... Read More
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Scott Rudkin
22 years experience in Emergency Medicine
Sounds normal: Sounds like you got a true thermal (cold) burn to to your arm. As such, the tissue needs to heal and can remain pink (assume not fire-red to indicate ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Miller
9 years experience in Family Medicine
Rewarming: Frostbite is, quite simply, frozen tissues. Depending on how severe the frostbite (i.e. How deep the freeze goes), the treatment can range from simply ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Otto Placik
33 years experience in Plastic Surgery
Gentle re-warming: Is generally the recommended course of action followed by assessment of chronic injury.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joseph Newman
31 years experience in Podiatry
Keep them warm!: Frostbite, even after recovery can leave permanent damage to the toes that last a lifetime. Prior frostbite increases your chances of your toes suffer ... Read More
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A 62-year-old member asked:
Dr. Adam Bodian
34 years experience in Dermatology
Keep warm: Frostbite is caused by overexposure to severe cold. Risk factors for getting frostbite include taking medicines called beta blockers, having diabetes ... Read More
1
1 comment

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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