Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

eyelid twitching

A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience Family Medicine
Several things: With these kinds of symptoms and their persistent nature, it's best if you see your doctor. He/she will listen to you, do an examination, possibly ru ... Read More
2
2 thanks
Dr. Michael Ham
26 years experience Ophthalmology
Myokymia: Random twitching of an eyelid, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles ... Read More
2
2 comments
1
1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Gillespie
40 years experience Ophthalmology
One or both at once : Monocular eye muscle twitch often due to eye muscle strain ie prolonged reading, improper correction etc. Binocular suggests neurological conditions a ... Read More
9
9 thanks
Dr. Michael Ham
26 years experience Ophthalmology
Myokymia: Random twitching of an eyelid, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles ... Read More
Dr. Olav Jaren
18 years experience Neurology
Eyelid twitch: Normally eyelid twitching means nothing, other than that those muscle fibers are tired. Twitching in the upper or lower lid briefly in one eye is not ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tal Raviv
Dr. Tal Raviv answered
25 years experience Ophthalmology
Unknown: You are describing myokymia - an involuntary twitching of the skin around the eyelids. It's believed to be related to lack of sleep, stress, and caff ... Read More
1
1 comment
10
10 thanks
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tal Raviv
Dr. Tal Raviv answered
25 years experience Ophthalmology
Myokymia: You are describing myokymia - an involuntary twitching of the skin around the eyelids. It's believed to be related to lack of sleep, stress, and caff ... Read More
17
17 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Baker
13 years experience Neurology
Blepharospasm: Often people can find things that can calm it down. Old wives tales say pressing the fingertips of all fingers down on hard surface can calm it down. ... Read More
11
11 thanks
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience Ophthalmology
Myokymia: Eyelid twitching, or myokymia, is a benign but annoying condition. Reducing your stress and reducing caffeine intake make help.
A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Eye twitch: Reduce intake of alcohol/tobacco/caffeine, get enough rest/sleep, artificial tears if dry eye, Botox injections, klonopin/ativan/trihexyphenidyl, othe ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ron Jones
Dr. Ron Jones answered
44 years experience Family Medicine
Irritability Nerve: The nerve sending signals to a particular muscle or part of that muscle is irritable for whatever reason. These "tics" are almost always benign, are ... Read More
8
8 thanks
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience Ophthalmology
Reduce caffeine.: Eyelid twitching, or myokymia, is an annoying but harmless disorder. Reducing caffeine helps.
1
1 thank
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience Family Medicine
See your doctor: These symptoms can only be adequately diagnosed only after a thorough evaluation by your doctor. This may include labs and other satudies. Once all ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month