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dopamine serotonin norepinephrine

A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Fisher
33 years experience Neurology
There are no levels: There are no "levels" of neurotransmitters (NTs) in the brain. They don't just float around freely as if in blood. NTs are constantly being dynamicall ... Read More
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A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Fisher
33 years experience Neurology
Go after it!: Kenneth, that's a great question. I encourage you to get a Ph.D. in neurobiology and devote your career to finding out the answer, because if you do, ... Read More
A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jane Kang
Dr. Jane Kang answered
20 years experience Psychiatry
No.: The levels of those chemicals in the brain can only be measured with a spinal tap. Any blood test does not really measure it because the the brain and ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Raising nor./ser./do: Mental and physical activity with healthy diet and lifestyle.
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Taylor
21 years experience Critical Care
No: How Risperdal (also called risperidone) works isn't entirely clear. It does act on Dopamine receptors, but it's an antagonist. It's also a serotonin r ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience Psychiatry
Yes: Yes, only dopaminergic neurons release dopamine, but there are several dopaminergic pathways in the brain. Dopaminergic neurons in midbrain are the m ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Barry Pierce
38 years experience Psychiatry
No: Effexor (venlafaxine) blocks serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake receptors.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
32 years experience Anesthesiology
No: At this time, there is no evidence to suggest this. As one may imagine, few if any studies have been performed in humans to look for this.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Strattera (atomoxetine): Inhibition is the opposite of stimulation, so the effectiveness is reduced.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stevan Cordas
56 years experience Internal Medicine
Serotonin: They are all neurotransmitters.
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glen Elliott
42 years experience Child Psychiatry
Still unclear: We know what they do--block reuptake at the neuron. But, why that helps with depression and anxiety, among other disorders, remains unclear. Especia ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience Psychiatry
No: Preclinical and clinical data demonstrate that bupropion acts via dual inhibition of norepinephrine and Dopamine reuptake, which constitutes a novel m ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bernadette Onuoha
37 years experience Psychiatry
No: Zoloft (sertraline) is selective for serotonin.
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Zoloft (sertraline): Yes it is. Dopamin reuptake inhibition increases as dose increase.
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Koenigsberg
41 years experience Psychiatry
Most newer ones: Most of the newer antidepressant medications affect specific neurotransmitters. Each does it slightly differently, accounting for the different respo ... Read More
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Ravi Chand
25 years experience Psychiatry
AA: All antipsychotics whether new or old have Dopamine blocking properties in the limbic region.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
TCA/SSRI: Both are, depending on what they are prescribed for. The difference is in tolerability & side-effects.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shaym Puppala
24 years experience Internal Medicine
Evidence says not: One meta-analysis* (a study pooling results from multiple other studies) suggested that reboxetine is ineffective & may be harmful. *(eyding d et.A ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Susan Uhrich
35 years experience Psychiatry
In short, yes.: Wellbutrin (bupropion) is a norepinephrine/dopamine agonist.
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Haupt
48 years experience Psychiatry
Just one type: "selective" in this case refers to the fact that the previous generation of antidepressants, the tricyclics, worked on all 3 of the neurotransmitters ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Novelty seeking: Some examples are compulsive gambling, hypersexuality & overeating.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glen Elliott
42 years experience Child Psychiatry
Several: Although ssris have been by far the most popular class of antidepressants for many years, there are several other options that focus on different syst ... Read More
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A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Veena Govila
59 years experience Internal Medicine
Ssri: Yes.
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeff Jacobs
21 years experience Child Psychiatry
No: It is a Dopamine antagonist, not an agonist.
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1 thank

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