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difference between aphasia and dyslexia

A 25-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nalinaksha Joshi
22 years experience in Neurology
See below: Aphasia is disorder of language (loosely called speech). Dyslexia is problem of writing, reading.

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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kristi Woods
22 years experience in Pediatrics
Different: Aphasia involves more than just written language, and is a term used more with the inability to express things, although the definition includes compr ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Cynthia Rector
28 years experience in Psychiatry
Ability vs Memory: Aphasia is a problem specifically of language. It is usually caused by damage to specific areas of the brain. The person may be able to understand ot ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Luis Villaplana
34 years experience in Internal Medicine
Lack vs garbled: Aphasia is lack of ability to communicate. Dysarthria is garbled or unintelligible speech. Both are common complications of a stroke.
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gregory LaMorte
41 years experience in Periodontics
Speech: Dysphasia is a partial or complete impairment of the ability to communicate resulting from brain injury. Autism is a developmental disorder that ap ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anthony LaBarbera
27 years experience in Pediatrics
See below: Autism effects speech, cognition, and socialization. Speech apraxia/dyspraxia only effects speech.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Jacobs
31 years experience in Neurology
Degree: Under the umbrella condition termed pervasive developmental disorders, there is a spectrum of severity where the least severe condition has been refer ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. J. Kirk Clopton
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Unclear: There is no specific definition for what qualifies as "high functioning autism", so it is difficult to answer the question. High functioning autism of ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Autism includes : Language delay. Not everybody with language delay has autism. www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/speech.htm speech and language delay and disorder. ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Passer
34 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Similar: The pragmatic language deal is a possible component of Asperger syndrome. It is not yet an officially recognized diagnosis. It involves the use of lan ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carla Enriquez
49 years experience in Pediatrics
Yes: Expressive language problems are usually due to brain synthesis of intended output. Dysgraphia is more peripheral & refers to problems writing. One co ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Chirag Patel
Specializes in Neurology
They're related: In expressive aphasias, the individual knows what he/she wants to say but has difficulty communicating it to others. The form of communication can be ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience in Neurology
It's HUH? vs. DARN!: In sensory aphasia the patient has a comprehension problem. What is said to them is not correctly understood or registered resulting in perfectly form ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
45 years experience in Pediatrics
Learning potential: Mental retardation implies a lower iq or learning potential.Adhd is a condition where the brain has problems controlling distractability, impulsive be ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Fred Gallo
35 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Equivalent: They both refer to the same disorder as a result of damage to a cerebral hemisphere.
A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael H. T. Sia
30 years experience in Pediatrics
See below: Dyspraxia: problems with movement & coordination. Aka "motor learning disability". Those with dyspraxia find it hard to carry out smooth & coordinate ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Autism spectrum: Please refer to the following review.En.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/autism_spectrum the autism spectrum or autistic spectrum describes a range of conditions c ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Goldie
47 years experience in Pediatric Neurology
Specific testing: All children develop at different rates. Some learn to talk early (especially girls), some late, and some regress in language. Some develop rapid mo ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bernard Seif
39 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Adult ADHD is an: inability to focus on a specific thought or task for very long and includes hyperactivity on the part of the person. Dementia is unrelated and refers ... Read More
A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Seth Kunen
44 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Different disorders: Adhd refers to problems with attention, impulsivity, and/or hyperactivity. "executive" functions are not as well developed as they should be. Asperg ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Julian Bragg
16 years experience in Neurology
Awareness: In hemianopia, the person is unable to see objects on one side of his or her visual field, but is still aware of their presence by means of their othe ... Read More
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3 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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