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cocaine use with a pacemaker defibrillator

A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Milunski
36 years experience Cardiology
Pacemakers: Strong magnetic fields such as those used in security metal detectors and magnetic fields produced by large electric motors can interfere with pacemak ... Read More
3
3 thanks
Dr. Jason Rubenstein
19 years experience Cardiology
It Varies: Sources of electronic or magnetic fields (emi) can cause inappropriate function of a pacemaker or icd. Examples of these are mris, strong electric mo ... Read More
1
1 thank
Dr. John Garner
15 years experience Cardiology
High Energy Sources: Induction cooktops arc welders, esp 240v and/or >200a alternators and other high-current generators nerve stimulators microwaves, phones, etc ar ... Read More

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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Milunski
36 years experience Cardiology
Pacemakers: Strong magnetic fields such as those used in security metal detectors and magnetic fields produced by large electric motors can interfere with pacemak ... Read More
1
1 thank
Dr. Jason Rubenstein
19 years experience Cardiology
It Varies: Sources of electronic or magnetic fields (emi) can cause inappropriate function of a pacemaker or icd. Examples of these are mris, strong electric mot ... Read More
1
1 thank
Dr. John Garner
15 years experience Cardiology
High Energy Sources: Induction cooktops arc welders, esp 240v and/or >200a alternators and other high-current generators nerve stimulators microwaves, phones, etc ar ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Rashba
28 years experience Cardiology
Noisemakers: Anything that creates electrical noise in the environment- strong magnetic fields, security scanners, cell phones directly over the device, cautery us ... Read More
5
5 thanks
Dr. Jason Rubenstein
19 years experience Cardiology
It Varies: Sources of electronic or magnetic fields (emi) can cause inappropriate function of a pacemaker or icd. Examples of these are mris, strong electric mot ... Read More
Dr. John Garner
15 years experience Cardiology
High Energy Sources: Induction cooktops arc welders, esp 240v and/or >200a alternators and other high-current generators nerve stimulators microwaves, phones, etc ar ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Not many: Arc welding is the main one.
A 58-year-old female asked:
Dr. Saptarshi Bandyopadhyay
20 years experience Hospital-based practice
Many reasons.: The ejection fraction (EF) as measured by echocardiograms, MUGA scans, cardiac MRI, etc. is a variable - it can fluctuate depending on the body's cond ... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Philip Kern
42 years experience Endocrinology
No to "natural": If you are hypothyroid, you should take levothyroxine. So called "natural" thyroid is from slaughterhouse bovine thyroid, and contains a mixture of d ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Budi Bahureksa
30 years experience Cardiology
??: We can't be sure -- but the person may have poor quality of life when the pacemaker run out of its power.
1
1 thank
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Invisible fencing: I have seen no literature on this type of device interfering with pacer/icd function. I doubt it would be a problem but it shouldn't be a problem stay ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Jost
35 years experience Cardiology
Heart Rhythm: Pacemakers control the rate of the heart's beat. Defibrillators deliver shock(s) to try to return the heart to a normal rhythm.
3
3 thanks
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Rashba
28 years experience Cardiology
No: Pacemakers just treat slow heart rhythms. Defibrillators can act as a pacemaker but can also treat fast dangerous heart rhythms by speeding up the hea ... Read More
4
4 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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