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atrial septal defect closure in adults

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
44 years experience Cardiology
Catheter or knife: It can be repaired percutaneously through a catheter inserted through the leg or arm or by open surgery.
Dr. Mario Matos-Cruz
39 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Which Type?: Sinus venosus ASD requires surgical correction. Although rare a ostium primum ASD may have escaped diagnosis in a young adult and that also requires s ... Read More
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3 thanks
Dr. Mohammed Numan
31 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
Cath or surgery: A lot of asd's can be closed by trans catheter approach. Occasionally (if thery are so large with no rims) need cardiac surgery.
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8 thanks

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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
44 years experience Cardiology
It happens: Generally there are 2 reasons for the delay in diagnosis: it's very small, doesn't need treatment, and doesn't matter or the individual has not been ... Read More
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1 thank
Dr. Charles Jost
36 years experience Cardiology
Not sure: About 1 in 4 people have a pfo, a patent foramen ovale, or small opening between the atria. In most people, this is not significant, but in some it c ... Read More
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9 thanks
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alex Golden
22 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
ASD: These are really arbitrary, subjective terms, but i think of small as less than 8mm, medium as 8-16mm and large as greater than 16mm. However, the bot ... Read More
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4 thanks
Dr. Creighton Wright
56 years experience General Surgery
Ok, varieties: Small can be from pinpoint patent foramen ovale to a centimeter or so. Large can be absence of the inter atrial wall! most secundum defects are ... Read More
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1 thank
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Lubienski
37 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Intervention or open: Less common today as most now diagnosed in infants. Many now repairable using catheter based techniques but if large still best fixed open. Slight ris ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Craig Carter
40 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Surgery: While there are multiple methods available, the best long and short term results are with surgery. Direct or patch closure of the defect is safe, repr ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Malpass
33 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
Not usually: An ASD does not generally affect oxygen delivery to the brain (or the rest of the body). The only exception would be in the setting of severe pulmonar ... Read More
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1 thank
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
46 years experience Pediatrics
Defect in wall: An ASD is a defect (opening) in the wall (septum) that should form to separate the upper chambers of the heart.
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1 thank
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Callahan
29 years experience Cardiology
ASD: It is variable, depending on the size of the opening and the amount of blood traveling across it. Sometimes they are diagnosed in childhood, others ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shalabh Bansal
13 years experience Pediatrics
ASD: An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a communication (hole) in the atrial septum (wall between top two chambers of the heart). It usually results in extra ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jon Grischkan
16 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
See a cardiologist: This can be serious, as a blood clot from the lower legs can cross the ASD and cause a stroke.

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