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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vasu Brown
33 years experience Integrative Medicine
Disease of nervecell: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or als, is a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement. Als does n ... Read More
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ryan Stanton
17 years experience Emergency Medicine
Lou Gehrig's Disease: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als), also referred to as lou gehrig's disease is a form of motor neuron disease caused by the degeneration of neurons ... Read More
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Similar : But most childhood illnesses which affect the motor neuron, like als, are quite rare, and more hereditary in origin. A variety of such disorders caus ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Lou Gehrig's disease: Als is a disease affecting the nerve cell body, causes weakness, muscle wasting, and fasciculations or fluttering of the muscles. It can affect mobil ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Julian Bragg
16 years experience Neurology
Still same person: As far as the disease itself is concerned, let them know that it is weakening their muscles, which affects everyone differently, causing difficulty wa ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Not similar diseases: Als is very different, and is a disease of "mis-folded proteins" like alzheimers and parkinson's, and all of these affect older people. Ms is an autoi ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Josephine Ruiz-healy
38 years experience Pediatrics
Lou Gehrig's disease: Muscle weakness, lack of coordination, trouble swallowing and breathing, speech problems, paralysis that get progressively worse. It does not affect c ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Olav Jaren
18 years experience Neurology
Charcot: The French Neurologist Charcot is credited with the paper describing ALS as a distinct illness
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Walsh
16 years experience Addiction Medicine
Unlikely: While dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) can be a herald of als, this is a very, very rare disease, and dysphagia is a common symptom. Depending on yo ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Hope it arrives.: There is a lot of research and we have identified a misfolded protein as playing a role (superoxide dismutase). But we do not have a cure. Best we c ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Holly Barth
8 years experience General Practice
Lou Gehrig's: Als also known as lou gehrig's disease is a disease of nerves. It is a progressive loss of muscle strength. Initial symptoms are usually muscle weakne ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Diagnosis: Since we hope to find alternative problems instead of als, we search for possible other diagnoses. The testing includes blood studies, especially for ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Grant Linnell
23 years experience Radiology
ALS: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS (lou gehrig's disease) is a central nervous system disease that causes progressive loss of strength and coordinat ... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ian Stein
Dr. Ian Stein answered
20 years experience Neurology
It is not transmitte: It is not typically a heriditary or infectious disease. No one knows the exact cause.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Gene mutation: Ts is caused by a gene mutation.You can acquire it from a parent or get it as a new mutation, but the mutation effects every cell in the body. It can ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Golder Wilson
Specializes in Clinical Genetics
Rarely: Rare families have a genetic form of ALS that involves the gene for superoxide dismutase or other genes. More commonly, ALS occurs sporadically in fam ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Variation of ALS: Motor neuron disease or ALS presents in several variable forms, and is a disease of motor neuron degeneration in brain and spinal cord. In the primar ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
See below: We really do not understand the cause, but 10% are genetic and 25% of these are associated with mutations of a gene encoding copper/zinc superoxide di ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Singer
50 years experience Pediatric Neurology
Neurological disorde: Tuberous sclerosis is a disorder involving brain structure, skin manifestations and cognitive function. Brain malformations called tubers are charact ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Bad disease: ALS damages the motor nerve cell in brain and spinal cord causing progressive arm and leg weakness, muscle flickering, with progressive disability. I ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Not good: Lou gehrig's disease remains resistant to successful treatment or control. The drug Riluzole is on the market but is very disappointing, although may ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. J. patrick Tokarz
Specializes in Family Medicine
Worse: Many patients with MS fell worse in the heat.
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A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Julian Bragg
16 years experience Neurology
Progressive disease: Als is a progressive disease of motor neurons, both in the peripheral and the central nervous systems. There is no known cure, but there are treatmen ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Very difficult: ALS is a progressive nasty disease with NO cure or even significant control other than Riluzole, and causes muscular atrophy, weakness, fasciculations ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Lou Gehrig's disease: Als is a disease affecting the nerve cell body, causes weakness, muscle wasting, and fasciculations or fluttering of the muscles. It can affect mobil ... Read More
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A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience Neurology
Medication for ALS: The only FDA approved medication to treat ALS is something called Riluzole (Rilutek). Unfortunately, this medication is neither for pain nor can it c ... Read More
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90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
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Talk to a doctor
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