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alcoholism kidney failure

A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Sewa Legha
49 years experience Medical Oncology
None, if it is mild: Kidney failure can be acute(sudden in onset...In a matte rof days) or chrionic...Years in the making. Most people will feel unwell with low energy, f ... Read More
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A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Tony Ho
Dr. Tony Ho answered
13 years experience Infectious Disease
Many: Fatigue, anemia, fluid retention, lower extremity swelling/edema, all the way to confusion, coma, or cardiac arrhythmias due to electrolyte imbalance.
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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park answered
49 years experience Pediatrics
Not always: Chronic kidney failure is generally irreversible whereas acute renal failure can sometimes be adequately treated and reversed, e.g., hemolytic-uremic ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joseph Roosth
34 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes: Untreated renal failure results in the build up of toxic chemicals in the blood which have a multitude of negative effects on all organ systems. Fort ... Read More
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A 93-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Goldman
54 years experience Rheumatology
Not necessarily: The shrinking of the kidney can lead to decreased kidney function (kidney failure) but there are two kidneys and if one decreased function the oth ... Read More
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Sick: Doesn't sound good what do you want to know?
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Zevitz
36 years experience Internal medicine
Yes: Heart failure can cause decreased blood flow to the kidneys, causing decreased renal function. Renal failure can also exacerbate heart failure by incr ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pascale Lane
35 years experience Pediatric Nephrology and Dialysis
Yes: Diabetes is the most common cause of permanent kidney failure in most of the world. 40-50% of patients with diabetes will be affected by this complica ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tarek Naguib
39 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Not necessarily: Kidney failure may run in families but may not depending on the kind. Also, diabetes type 2 runs in families but some members get spared. Type 1 is mu ... Read More
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Emily Lu
Dr. Emily Lu answered
6 years experience Family Medicine
20-40%: About 40% of type 1 diabetes patients with kidney disease will develop kidney failure within 20 years without strict blood pressure and glucose contro ... Read More
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A 65-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dominic Riganotti
24 years experience Infectious Disease
Poor: Not good i'm afraid. The cardiac output alone is reaching a point of non-compatibility with life.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Cain
35 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Toxic insults: Low blood pressure, interruption of blood flow, obstruction of urine flow, drug allergies, toxic drugs, autoimmune disease, heart failure, chronic liv ... Read More
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park answered
49 years experience Pediatrics
Yes: Kidney failure is often associated with anemia. The lack of erythropoietin, an essential hormone produced by the kidneys that enhances red cell prod ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Reid Blackwelder
36 years experience Family Medicine
Many things: Kidney failure can be from problems before, within and after the kidneys(pre-, intrinsic, post-renal failure).Dehydration or poor blood flow from hear ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wayne Ingram
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Several conditions: Kidney failure can be caused by toxic chemicals, infection, congenital diseases, diabetes, high blood pressure, severe dehydration, and traumatic inju ... Read More
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A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Safford
34 years experience Critical Care
Renal Replacement Th: Dialysis is one of the treatments for metabolic acidosis. Depending on the cause as well as the other medical problems and type of the acidosis, corr ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Wigneswaran
25 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Liver and Kidney: Its a great question and complicated. The syndrome is called hepatorenal syndrome which is often because the amount of blood flow to the kidney is les ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Simon Kimm
15 years experience Urology
It can, if severe. : How much kidney damage reflux nephropathy can cause depends on the degree of reflux and the number and severity of kidney infections that may result. ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steve Montoya
46 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
No: No.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Quresh Khairullah
41 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Yes: Usually seen in children, it means the urine is flowing back wards into the ureters and kidney when the bladder contracts.This may be due to defective ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Evert Eriksson
17 years experience General Surgery
Possibly: Liver failure may cause ARDS but many other things must be known to determine if this is the case or not. Fluid overload can present like ARDS but is ... Read More
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4 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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