Related Questions

Could a MRI with contrast fail to identify a pituitary tumor?

Yes. Most pituitary tumors are "microadenomas", meaning that they are less than 1 CM in size. Mris done specifically to look for a pituitary tumor are very good at detecting tumors near 1 CM in size, and identify about 50% of tumors in the 0.3 CM size range, and would miss most tumors smaller than this. Read more...
Possibly. If it is a very small tumor it could be missed but usually not if there are symptoms that would allow the radiologist to look closely at the pituitary. Read more...

Is it possible that an MRI with contrast could miss a pituitary tumor?

Yes. If the tumor is very small it could be missed on mri. Read more...
Who is looking? Mri is a picture. It is like taking a picture of your car engine. Are the parts all there? Do they work well? Are there some extra pieces or growths or abnormal flow? The picture must be looked at by a competent and appropriate expert. Even then they may miss something unless they are prompted to look carefully - or it is too small or not in the picture that was taken. Read more...

I am going for a MRI head scan as I'm suspected to have a pituitary tumor. Will they test for all brain abnormalities or only this?

Probably. The MRI head scan should cover everything, unless your provider asked specifically not to. Sometimes the MRI focuses on the pituitary region only, but many times a full brain screening exam is done with the pituitary scan, so if there is anything else happening, this test will probably help. Read more...
Brain MRI. When performing a scan to assess pituitary function the whole brain will be imaged - i.e. the doctor will look at other brain structures besides the pituitary. Read more...

Having MRI to check pituitary tumor growth. Had coiling of aneurysm 3 months ago. Worried the coils could move because of vibration of the scan? Thanks.

Check with neurosurg. The concern with mris and aneurysm coils is whether or not they have MRI compatible metal. Generally, the coils that are currently used (at least in the United States) are all MRI compatible. You should check with your neuro-interventionalist or neurosurgeon who placed the coils. Generally the vibration of the MRI is not enough to move the coils. Read more...
Should be ok. Mr scanning causes heating of some metals and movement of ferrous metals. Modern day coils are made from platinum etc that are mr compatible. Vibration is not an issue. Confirm with your surgeon. Read more...