Can just anyone answer my questions about my plantar fasciitis or do I need podiatrist?

Many can aswer. Podiatrist have a great amount of experience on the topic.
See a physician. You want to make sure that you are getting answers to your questions but that you have been properly diagnosed with the right condition. There are many things that present as heel pain and a foot specialist (ie podiatrist or foot/ankle ortho) can help.
Not anyone. Assuming you do have plantar fasciitis, there is some good information on the web - you can check the websites for the american academy of orthopaedic surgeons or american orthopaedic foot & ankle society. If the pain doesn't go away, you can see an orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeon or a podiatrist. Be wary of anyone who doesn't recommend a stretching program as part of the treatment regimen.
Specialist is best. Primary care physicians often know a lot about plantar fasciitis, but to get all the tips and most aggressive treatment, you'll want to see a specialist. Podiatrists deal specifically with the foot and ankle, and can set up treatment regimens combining medications, injections, orthotics, shoe recommendations, and stretching exercises.
Plantar fasciitis. You can read a lot about it and do the exercises, lots of good sites such as the aofas. Org or the medscape etc, your primary doctor is a good place to start.

Related Questions

I have plantar fasciitis and I don't know out if consulting a podiatrist or home remedies for which to go?

See details. Arch supports and exercises can help but time is the ultimate cure. I would personally advise against injections.
Specialist is best. Primary care physicians often know a lot about plantar fasciitis, but to get all the tips and most aggressive treatment, you'll want to see a specialist. Podiatrists deal specifically with the foot and ankle, and can set up treatment regimens combining medications, injections, orthotics, shoe recommendations, and stretching exercises.
Many possibilities. Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, a condition that is sometimes also called heel spur syndrome when a spur is present. Heel pain may also be due to other causes, such as, infection, tendonitis, arthritis, stress fracture, nerve irritation, retained foreign body, bone tumor, or a cyst. Have it evaluated by a professional and get the appropriate treatment.
See a podiatrist. Clinical examination and symptoms can typically lead the doc to the diagnosis, but an x-ray is the first definitive test to differentiate the two conditions. However, stress fractures don't always show up within the first 2-3 weeks of injury, so subsequent follow-up x-rays may be ordered. By the way, you can have both simultaneously. Get checked. Don't try to do it alone...

How would you know if plantar fasciitis is chronic or not? By the number of episodes w/I a period of time, or is there a test a podiatrist can perform?

Well... There is a lot a podiatrist can do for plantar fasciitis after evaluating it in person: From prothetic inserts for your shoes, to teaching exercises, to splints, injections and even forms of ultrasound. You should not panic, and be proactive.
Length of time. Most PF lasts a few weeks at most. Recurrent and chronic last longer. Custom functional orthotics are the gold standard for those cases.

My podiatrist recommends a cortisone shot for my plantar fasciitis after 4 weeks and 2 weeks on naids. Are cortisone shots safe or should I continue with stretching?

Stretching. I would personally exhaust all other treatments before doing that. Stretching especially overnight is crucial to get plantar fasciitis under control (even if you decide to get the shot). Have you been working with a physical therapist? If not consider doing so. Hope you get some relief soon.
Avoid them. I would suggest avoiding cortisone shots for this issue. Cortisone liquifies fats and a misplaced injection can damage the fat that forms your heel pad. Stay with stretching and try orthotics. Plantar fasciitis take 3-6 months to resolve.
Cortisone is safe. The amount of cortisone that will be injected is insignificant and is really the gold standard in reducing symptoms from plantar fasciitis. Four weeks is long enough to wait before injection. Continue stretching nd use ice. Make sure you are wearing supportive foot gear.
Think. The advice you have been given is good. I inject then another spaced 2weeks later. I have found this to be extremely helpful in reducing symptoms.

I need 2nd opinion from a podiatrist or orthopedic doctor regarding my diagnosis off Plantar Fasciitis. I'm getting worse?

You can contact. Health Tap Concierge or look for a podiatrist or an orthopedic surgeon in your local area.
Not unusual. Making the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is not all that difficult. What is a problem, however, is coming up with a treatment regimen that works for every patient. Shoes, stretching, ice, heat, orthotics, injections and God knows whatever are all used and sometimes work. The problem is, they just don't work all the time. A second opinion might help to see if something was missed.

I have plantar fasciitis. My question is do I need to see a foot dr or will an over-the-counter insole work? I am very obese.

Try an insole. You can always try an insole in your shoe along with ice and stretching. If no results make an appointment with a podiatrist.
See. A foot dr. The otc supports will not be supportive enough to relieve symptoms.
OTC insoles. Can be tried but don't waste your money if you can pick them up and fold them in your hand as your weight will simply flatten them out.
Combo treatment.. If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections or eswt if available in your area.