8 doctors weighed in:

If ritalin (methylphenidate) is a stimulant how does it calm kids with adhd?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree

In brief: The basics

The basic issue with ad/adhd is thought to be the inability to screen out external stimulus form reaching the thinking processes.
The stimulants "turn on" a better screening center to eliminate the distracting inputs and allow a greater ability to focus and/or control activity overflow.At higher doses it often slows the kid and makes them sleepy.

In brief: The basics

The basic issue with ad/adhd is thought to be the inability to screen out external stimulus form reaching the thinking processes.
The stimulants "turn on" a better screening center to eliminate the distracting inputs and allow a greater ability to focus and/or control activity overflow.At higher doses it often slows the kid and makes them sleepy.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Shah Chowdhury
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree

In brief: ADHD

Imbalance of neurotransmitter metabolism in brain plays primary role in adhd.
There is reduced activation of certain parts of brain (prefrontal-striatal-thalamocortical). Medication like Ritalin (methylphenidate) stimulates release of such neuro-transmitters in the brain to bring to a balanced state so that the person has more self control. For this it is called stimulant. It doesn't stimulate the kid.

In brief: ADHD

Imbalance of neurotransmitter metabolism in brain plays primary role in adhd.
There is reduced activation of certain parts of brain (prefrontal-striatal-thalamocortical). Medication like Ritalin (methylphenidate) stimulates release of such neuro-transmitters in the brain to bring to a balanced state so that the person has more self control. For this it is called stimulant. It doesn't stimulate the kid.
Dr. Shah Chowdhury
Dr. Shah Chowdhury
Thank
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