I have apnea and hypopnea. My doctor told me that the only solution is to put the cpap machine. Is this true?

NO. According to the american academy of sleep medicine guidelines, you should be presented with all your options which includes oral appliances that keep the airway open. Other strategies are; weight loss, changing sleep positions, and surgery.
He is right but if. You are obese, weight loss is the ultimate treatment.
No. Depends on your osa severity. There are alternative treatment options such as oral appliance, surgery, and negative pressure therapy such as the winx system. Speak to a board certified fellowship trained sleep specialist.
No. According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine.
Nope. You probably have obstructive sleep apnea, much more common than central apnea (where one "forgets to breathe"). The only real treatment for central apnea is cpap, and while osa is treated with great success with CPAP too, other treatments for osa include weight loss and surgery to open the airway (up3, tongue base reduction, septoplasty, etc.). Talk with an ENT surgeon to assess your candidacy.
YES and NO. The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea. But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.

Related Questions

Sleep study just revealed I have: moderate sleep fragmentation, leg movement, mild apnea, and sleep disordered breathing (hypopnea). Can this be treated? Nurse said a cpap machine wouldn't help me, but referring to respirology. Anything I can take (supp

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See a Sleep MD. It depends on your actual sleep study. I would have it reviewed with a sleep physician. Sometimes patients with mild apnea and significant daytime symptoms do benefit from cpap. Also, depending on the significance of the leg movements, getting that taken care of will help as well. Read more...
CPAP works. CPAP or an oral appliance alternative can often help, but the leg movement is likely what your nurse was referring to when saying CPAP won't help. CPAP is the "gold standard", but an oral appliance from a sleep dentist is perfect for mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Read more...
I disagree. CPAP would potentially tx all of these symptoms. Sleep disordered breathing includes hypopneas as well as apneas so if your ahi is > 5, a CPAP would be indicated. Plm's during a sleep study have been shown to improve with CPAP use and generally osa in and of itself can cause sleep fragmentation given the frequent arousals associated with resp events. Speak w/ sleep specialist instead of nurse. Read more...

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