8 doctors weighed in:
Thyroid cancer: what are the odds they have the diagnosis wrong?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Who diagnosed?
If a pathologist made the diagnosis, the odds of wrong diagnosis are very very low.
Denial by the patient is far more likely than wrong diagnosis by a pathologist.

In brief: Who diagnosed?
If a pathologist made the diagnosis, the odds of wrong diagnosis are very very low.
Denial by the patient is far more likely than wrong diagnosis by a pathologist.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Thank
Dr. Barry Rosen
Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: How was Dx made?
The statistical measure of an inaccurate test result is a false positive test.
The incidence of false (+) following a fine-needle thyroid biopsy can be quite high depending on the findings. However, if this DX was established following thyroid surgery, the rate of false (+) is less-than 1%. If you need reinforcement, your doctor can request a second opinion from a different pathologist.

In brief: How was Dx made?
The statistical measure of an inaccurate test result is a false positive test.
The incidence of false (+) following a fine-needle thyroid biopsy can be quite high depending on the findings. However, if this DX was established following thyroid surgery, the rate of false (+) is less-than 1%. If you need reinforcement, your doctor can request a second opinion from a different pathologist.
Dr. Barry Rosen
Dr. Barry Rosen
Thank
Dr. Farhad Sigari
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Depends on the bx
If the diagnosis was made after thyroidectomy - the chances are not high that they got it wrong, unless the pathologist is not used to looking at thyroid specimens.
I have had them mistake hashimotos' thyroiditis for follicular carcinoma. This is easily cleared up by sending the slides to an academic or outside consultation. Papillary carcinoma is usually pretty clear on microscopic exam.

In brief: Depends on the bx
If the diagnosis was made after thyroidectomy - the chances are not high that they got it wrong, unless the pathologist is not used to looking at thyroid specimens.
I have had them mistake hashimotos' thyroiditis for follicular carcinoma. This is easily cleared up by sending the slides to an academic or outside consultation. Papillary carcinoma is usually pretty clear on microscopic exam.
Dr. Farhad Sigari
Dr. Farhad Sigari
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Farhad Sigari
By the way, the pathologists who dont look at a lot of thyroid specimens tend to refer them out for outside consultation without having to ask them. They dont want to give the wrong diagnosis any more than you want to get the wrong diagnosis. But if there is any concern, as a patient you can request for this. Talk to your surgeon - they will be a good advocate for you.
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Dr. Marsha Davis
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