4 doctors weighed in:

Is it more likely to get a kidney stone by drinking aspirin and paracetamol with coke? Or is it just as likely if you don't?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ravinder Nagpaul
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: May be

High amount of any sugary drinks like coke etc raise your chances of formation of kidney stones.
On the other hand ch use of paracetamol and other NSAID like Motrin etc cause kidney damage directly so any combination of both in heavy amounts and over a long period is not good for kidneys.

In brief: May be

High amount of any sugary drinks like coke etc raise your chances of formation of kidney stones.
On the other hand ch use of paracetamol and other NSAID like Motrin etc cause kidney damage directly so any combination of both in heavy amounts and over a long period is not good for kidneys.
Dr. Ravinder Nagpaul
Dr. Ravinder Nagpaul
Thank
1 comment
Dr. John Tillett
I would say, to be fair, that drinking high-sugar drinks like cola or juice drinks increase your risk of obesity, which is itself a risk factor for stones, but it cannot be said that these drinks directly cause stones. Multiple studies have failed to demonstrate direct causation.
2 doctors agree

In brief: Probably not...

But this question has never been formally studied, so who knows? The bottom line is that none of the three substances you are asking about have been linked to increased risk of kidney stone formation.

In brief: Probably not...

But this question has never been formally studied, so who knows? The bottom line is that none of the three substances you are asking about have been linked to increased risk of kidney stone formation.
Dr. John Tillett
Dr. John Tillett
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Hermilando Payen
I would worry more about the long term consequence of overloading your body with sugary drinks for whatever medicine you take, instead of water, because sugary habits can lead to diabetes and damage of your kidney filtering system.
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