Are scope gallbladder removal scars big?

No. Most gallbladder removal scars are small. That's why they call it "bandaid surgery!" they should be less than an inch in length, although the one in the umbilicus can be a little larger if the gallbladder is full of stones or has a really large stone. There is now no reason to fear removing the gallbladder because of the scar as most people can have endoscopic removal.
Usually NOT. The incisions are only large enough to permit placement of skin protection sheaths, and are closed following the surgery. In some cases, it is advised to let the scars mature (months) before deciding to have any revision. Revisions can be done effectively as the repair can be performed in layers and without the distortion that occurs with the ports for the scopes.
No. Typically less than 2 cm each (usually more like 1 cm). There is often a bigger incision, but this is usually hidden in the belly button.

Related Questions

What to do about my scar tissue 2 years after gallbladder removal?

Symptomatic? Are you symptomatic from the scar tissue? Are you referring to the external scars on your skin or internal scaring? If internal scaring, referred to as adhesions, is causing you symptoms, your surgeon may recommend a lysis of adhesions to break up the scar tissue. Read more...

Is scar tissue from a gallbladder removal via laparoscopy dangerous at all? Should I leave it like this?

Adhesions, This scar tissue to which you refer, called "adhesions", will always occur after surgery - part of the post-operative healing process. At times, they can cause obstruction of the intestines which may require hospitalization or even more surgical management, but there's nothing we can do preemptively to not make that happen. Thankfully this is not the norm. Read more...

I have pain in my upper abdominal where I have a scar from my gallbladder removal in 05. Physical activity usually makes it sore. Ct show nothing?

Adhesion. You most likely have an adhesion on the peritoneal side of the healed wound which can be painful. You may also have an incisional hernia . If you are having symptoms you should see the surgeon who did the procedure if possible. Read more...
Adhesions or sludge? There can be many reasons that may not be necessarily visible on a ct scan. Functional studies may also be indicated as well as MRI or ercp. I would discuss with your gastroenterologist. Read more...