How successful is surgery for meniscal knee tears?

Depends. Depends on the size of the tear. In most cases results are very good. Your surgeon is the best guide.

Related Questions

Oblique horizontal meniscal posterior horn tear extending to inferior surface. Can surgery give good outcome for plasterer/roofer (much used knee)?

That very much. depends on your symptoms and level of functioning now, If you are able to perform what you need and want to do now then don't have surgery. Quite the contrary, if you cannot or are in too much pain then an arthroscopic meniscoplasty in skilled hands can perform wonders. Read more...

Female, 69, physically very active, good health, with left knee pain and decreased range of motion. Mri :complex medial meniscal tear. Surgery only?

Not necessary...... Try physical therapy for decreased rom and strengthening of quad. Take steroid injection. If no improvement in 3-4 weeks, then go for surgery. Read more...
Probably. If you have a complex tear of the medial meniscal cartilage, then it usually does not heal on its own. Limited range of motion can occur when the cartilage is broken or flipped out of position. If your pain persist, you will probably need endoscopic surgery. Ask your doctor for a referral to an Orthopedic Doctor. Read more...

Female, 69, knee pain, very active, good health, mri-complex medial meniscal tear with small medial femoral condylar marrow contusion. Surgery only? Thx!

Not necessary....... It will depend upon your lifestyle and how active are you. If not highly active, try conservative treatment like pain management with medication, steroid injection for inflammation and physical therapy for quadricep strengthening. If conservative treatment fails, then reevaluation is needed. Read more...
Maybe. The good news is that the small marrow contusion should heal with conservative treatment without any complications. The bad news is that a complex medial meniscal tear usually will not heal, and surgery will probably be necessary at some point. Read more...

Can I treat a meniscus/knee injury without surgery?

Sometimes. Some meniscal tears become asymptomatic without surgery. Generally, such tears occur in patients over the age of 30 and are not associated with trauma as they result from degenerative changes in the meniscus (think: gray hair or wrinkle). Tears in young people, associated with ligament injuries, and with symptoms (swelling, locking, instability, pain) lasting more than 6 weeks require surgery. Read more...
Yes, possibly. Not all meniscus tears are the same, and asymptomatic tears do not require surgery. If a tear continues to be bothersome, blocks motion or significantly inhibits normal activities of daily living despite an adequate course of nonoperative management (rest, ice, elevation, and a graduated physical therapy program), then arthroscopy to repair or debride the tear becomes warranted. Read more...
Therapy. If you have a meniscus tear that is amenable to repair, i suggest surgery because of your young age. If repair is not an option, then nsaids, ice, therapy. Read more...
Usually not. If you have a meniscus tear that is symptomatic, you will most likely require arthroscopic surgery. Read more...

How can you promote and allow full recovery of a knee injury to avoid athritis and surgery?

Depends on injury. One can expect full recovery after minor sprains/strains. More severe injuries (ligament ruptures, cartilage tears) may best be treated surgically to optimize recovery and in theory slow/prevent evolution of arthritis. For symptoms (pain, swelling, catching, locking) persisting for more than 4-6 wks expert opinion should be sought. Read more...