10 doctors weighed in:

What types of tumors spinal tumors wrap around the spinal cord?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Reichert
Neurosurgery
6 doctors agree

In brief: Spinal Cord Tumor

Although spinal cord tumors are rarer than brain tumors, lesions of the spinal covering (meningiomas), spinal nerves (schwanomma or neurofibroma) or a metastatic tumor from breast or prostrate are the most common tumors to wrap around the spinal cord.
Tumors of the spinal cord (ependymoma or astrocytoma) may look like its surrounding the cord, but are usually inside the tissue.

In brief: Spinal Cord Tumor

Although spinal cord tumors are rarer than brain tumors, lesions of the spinal covering (meningiomas), spinal nerves (schwanomma or neurofibroma) or a metastatic tumor from breast or prostrate are the most common tumors to wrap around the spinal cord.
Tumors of the spinal cord (ependymoma or astrocytoma) may look like its surrounding the cord, but are usually inside the tissue.
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Dr. Atif Haque
Neurosurgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Multiple

Some tumors involve the bones of the spine, while others occur in the spinal canal, sometimes in the spinal cord itself.
Some of the more common types that occur "around the spinal cord" are meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors, like schwannomas or neurofibromas. Also metastatic cancer can, too.

In brief: Multiple

Some tumors involve the bones of the spine, while others occur in the spinal canal, sometimes in the spinal cord itself.
Some of the more common types that occur "around the spinal cord" are meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors, like schwannomas or neurofibromas. Also metastatic cancer can, too.
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Dr. Kenneth Casey
Neurosurgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Menigiomas

One tumor that can potentially wrap around the spinal cord originates in the covering of the cord-the dura of the meniges.
This non-malignat tumor grows from any quarter of the sac, and can grow across the surface of the dura, covering the cord.

In brief: Menigiomas

One tumor that can potentially wrap around the spinal cord originates in the covering of the cord-the dura of the meniges.
This non-malignat tumor grows from any quarter of the sac, and can grow across the surface of the dura, covering the cord.
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