What are trigger points?

Pain in Muscles. Trigger points are focal areas of muscle fibers within a muscle that are hyperirritable. They are felt to be small areas of contracted muscle within taut bands of muscle. When these trigger points are pressed they cause pain not only locally, but can cause referred pain at a different site.
Painful areas. Located in muscles or on tendon or ligament attachment sites in various parts of the body. Essentially , places that should not be painful to touch , are painful. They need to be evaluated for cause and for direction of treatment.

Related Questions

What are trigger points for jumper's knee?

Patella tendon. Jumper's knee refers to patella tendonitis which we see commonly in jumping athletes in sports such as basketball or volleyball. With your knee extended straight your knee cap will be tender at the very bottom of it, this tenderness tends to reduce with the knee bent. The site of the problem is where your patella tendon attaches to the patella or "kneecap". Read more...

Can doctors tell me what does trigger points mean in orthopedic terms?

Trigger points. A trigger point describes a tight band of skeletal muscle located within a larger muscle group which causes radicular, sharp pain. There are a variety of treatments for trigger points including deep tissue massage, myofasical release, dry needling and injections. Discuss this with your physician to see if you indeed have trigger points. Read more...

What's myogelosis is it trigger points?

Muscle pain. I am not familiar with that term. Perhaps you are referring to fibromyalgia, a condition involving muscle and joint pain as well as fatigue. The syndrome can include anxiety or depression, a greater sensitivity to pain, resulting in trigger points, chronic headaches, stiffness, and other symptoms. See your doctor for an evaluation if you are concerned that you have this condition. Read more...
Tissue density. Strictly it is increased tissue density in the muscle but many soft tissue specialists and acupuncturist use the term to refer to an increased tissue density even in the subcutaneous tissue. Again some use the term interchangeably with a trigger point, but in reality it doesn't. It could be a tender point without any particular "triggered" accepted referred pain pattern which defines a trigger pt. Read more...
Knots. "hardened areas or nodules within muscles, especially the gluteal muscles." can occur after a variety of conditions especially antibiotic injections. Of no significance. Read more...
Not exactly. There are histological changes of fibroconnective tissue within muscle in the case of myogelosis. One good theory is that they are the result of untreated trigger points and difficult to treat. Sort of like wounds and scars. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10398386 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2774893/ Read more...