Do respiratory doctors deal with obstructive sleep apnea?

Yes. Pulmonologists, ents, and some neurologists all diagnose & treat sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea.
Varies. Often, specialty areas of medicine deal with the sleep apnea issues like neurologists, ENT's and respiratory doctors. It is not limited to just one specialty.
Sleep doc. In addition to what stated in dr. Bansal's answer, there are also docs who specialize in sleep medicine only.
Yes. Depends on locality and referral patterns. Ask your MD for referral if OSA is suspected.

Related Questions

Why don't respiratory doctors deal with obstructive sleep apnea instead neurologists?

They do. Usually the pulmonologist and neurologist will interpret the sleep study and the order CPAP treatment. Read more...
Both. In my practice, i get referrals from both neurologists and pulmonary specialists. I tend to especially get the referrals of patients who cannot tolerate the CPAP machine or are not severe enough to warrant a cpap. Both of these specialties are invaluable! Read more...
CPAP. As a psychologist, i've heard from patients that there are many cognitive benefits from cpap. Improved memory and attention are just two. Of course, these might improve because the person is not as tired anymore, but i'm willing to bet empirical evidence will show cognitive enhancements. Read more...
Both. Both specialists evaluate and treat OSA patients. Often depends on community referral patterns. Read more...

Are any special tests needed, or can a regular doctor see me for my obstructive sleep apnea?

Sleep study. In order to diagnose sleep apnea you have to have a sleep study (also known as a polysomnogram). This can be ordered by any doctor. An ENT can also evaluate your upper airway anatomy for potentially correctable conditions. Read more...
Primary care. Patients can start with there primary care doctor, who can screen for sleep apnea and order a sleep test. The test itself is read usually by a sleep specialist. Sleep specialists can be found in many specialties. Often they are pulmonologists (lung doctors) because the therapy involves a machine that affects the air pressure in the airway. Still neurologists, and ENT doctors often have an interest. Read more...
Gather Information. A primary care can do a physical evaluation as well as gather clinical symptoms to evaluate you for sleep apnea. An epworth sleepiness scale and berlin questionnaire can be answered that can help gauge the degree of sleepiness or risk for having sleep apnea. A sleep study will ultimately need to be done to get a formal diagnosis. Read more...
Primary Care MD. Start with your primary care doc. He/she will direct evaluation based on his/her evaluation. Read more...

Is it possible that my general practicioner doctor do anything about my obstructive sleep apnea?

Obstructive sleep. If you have been diagnosed with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea, a dentist who has been trained to take a physiological registration of the forward jaw position necessary to open the airway (without protruding the jaw too far forward- which can cause tmd problems- like headaches and jaw pain) can have a custom made appliance fabricated to increase the oxygen as well as help stop snoring. Read more...
General dentist. A general dentist who is trained can fabricate an oral appliance that is worn during sleep . These can be as effective as CPAP in treating patients with mild or moderate sleep apnea, or someone with severe sleep apnea who cannot tolerate cpap. Read more...
Referral. He/she can send you for a sleep study, then refer you to a Pulmonologist with subspecialty training in sleep disorders for treatment. Read more...
Possible. Some GPs also practice management of sleep apnea patients. Otherwise, best course is to refer you to a board-certified sleep specialist. Read more...
Yes. They can access you for severity of sleep apnoea and also refer you for sleep studies which help to decide the management . http://patient.info/doctor/obstructive-sleep-apnoea-syndrome-pro. Read more...

Do doctors see a lot of patients with obstructive sleep apnea?

I do. I do, but my practice is limited to sleep disorders, so there is selection bias. Primary care physicians (pcp) see a lot of people complaining of difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying awake, and of generally unsatisfatory sleep quality. Some of these are sent to sleep centers for further evaluation and some are managed by the pcp. 10% of people suffer from insomnia; 9-24% from sleep apnea. Read more...
Yes. As a primary care and sleep specialist, I see a lot of patient with sleep apnea. We use the Berlin Questionnaire to screen patients as well as the Epworth Sleepiness Scale to quantify peoples level of sleepiness. Read more...

At my last check up, I forgot to tell the doctor about obstructive sleep apnea. Is that ok?

No. No, sleep apnea is a lot like diabetes in that it causes problems long term. Hypertension, heart disease, stroke are all more common in apnea patients. Let your doctor know. Read more...
Of course, but. Obstructive sleep apnea is very important as it can be very serious; even life threatening. So, tomorrow, call your doctor's office and explain to the receptionist that you need to make another appointment for a breathing problem. That should get their attention and get an appt. Sooner. Before your appt., write down your symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea. Bring this paper to appt. Tell dr. Read more...
Let the doc know. You always want to let your doctors know if you have sleep apnea. Sedating medications can have an effect on the degree of apnea you have. Also, anesthesia can also be dangerous as well too. I suggest calling your doctor and letting them know, especially if you're not being treated for sleep apnea. Read more...
Inform MD. Call the office and tell the assistant to tell the Doc. Some conditions (for example high blood pressure) are related to sleep disorders. That information may alter the approach to any medical problems you have. Read more...

Is there anything I can get from the grocery store or drug store for my obstructive sleep apnea until I can see a doctor?

No. Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition that is related to things such as being overweight and certain characteristics of your throat ad airway passages. The treatment is based upon getting more air into your lungs. There is nothing that you can buy before you have a formal evaluation by the doctor. Read more...
Sleep apnea. 10-20 lbs weight loss can significantly reduce the obstruction. You could also quit alcoholic beverages. Read more...
No. Do not try any of the over-the-counter oral mouthpieces. They may create some major TMJ/TMD issues. Read more...
A few ideas. Good advice here: http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2014/09/alternative-therapies-obstructive-sleep-apnea/ Read more...

I have obstructive sleep apnea and now I have flu is this dangerous and should I see my doctor.

Dangerous. Both sleep apnea and flu are dangerous particularly if they occur together. As soon as you can please see your primary doctor and the sleep team. If you are very concerned now, please go to the nearest Emergency Room. Read more...
FLU-SLEEP APNEA NG. Sleep apnea itself is a disease that can have deadly consequences. So can the flu. Don't self diagnose. Have an MD see you immediately to conclude you have the flu and get it treated. If you have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and are not being treated, stop procrastinating. Read more...
Seasonal flu + OSA. is very common viral infection. Usually the condition resolves on its own with home care. Drink water and get a good rest. NSAIDs (e.g. Aleve, Advil) or Tylenol (acetaminophen) are also recommended every 6 hours. An untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can have a significant impact on your personal health. If concerned, see your PCP for examination. Read more...

My doc perscribed Xanax (alprazolam) 1mg XR to help me sleep. I am currently being investigated for having "obstructive sleep apnea". Is it safe to take the Xanax (alprazolam)?

Not really. Some medical conditions may interact with Xanax (alprazolam). Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:. Some medical conditions may interact with Xanax (alprazolam) , especially if any of following apply to you: if you have a history of seizures, glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye, kidney or liver problems, lung or breathing problems . Read more...
Sleep apnea. What do you mean by "being investigated"- Have you had a sleep test and you are waiting for results? Generally Xanax (alprazolam) would be OK- but if you have sleep apnea I doubt it would stop the AHI which is how many times you stop breathing each hour during your sleep. Read more...
No. if you are having trouble sleeping and are being tested for OSA than often these two issues go hand in hand and your sleep may improve upon treating the OSA. I would recommend waiting until you get your sleep study results back. Read more...
Not recommended. You should not not take sleeping pills if you have obstructive sleep apnea. The benzodiazepines (Xanax) have been shown to decrease breathing in patients with OSA and increase AHI index. See a sleep specialist for evaluation and sleep study. Read more...
Ask sleep MD. It may interfere with any planned sleep studies. Ask sleep specialist. Read more...

Does obstructive sleep apnea affect heart function or Atherosclerosis in the arteries? In which way is it a risk factor for heart disease? Thanks doctors

OSA results in. low amounts of oxygen reaching your heart muscle, which can predispose you to a heart attack. Read more...
Yes. Sleep apnea is one of common condition contributing high blood presssure , heart condition ... due to frequentcepisides of apnea(" not breathing") there is lack of oxygen delivery to vital organs as brain , heart.Result is malaise, High blood preassure ... it it self can put straun on heart muscle and lead to heart failure. See MD for sleep study and exam . . Read more...
Yes. Yes, primarily through increased blood pressure which predisposes you to coronary artery disease. Get evaluated and treated early. Read more...