Is a 3 mm breast cyst too small to aspirate?

Too small . A breast cyst that is 3mm is usually too small to aspirate. They are usually observed to see if they get larger, then they can be addressed or disappear on their own.

Related Questions

If a small complicated breast cyst (no intracystic mass) is aspirated & confirmed cancerous. No nodes. What are the treatment options? Surgery?

Complex issue. An aspirate from a breast cyst that was confirmed cancerous is a complex issue. It is best to consult with a cancer center that has a board of specialist physicians dealing with all aspects of cancer treatment to provide an opinion as to what is the best approach to this situation. Read more...

Abnormal cells found in breast cyst aspirate. Cells chunkier than normal. What could cause this?

Your doc must answer. As a pathologist, I use many different words but "chunkier" isn't one that's familiar to me from breast biopsy aspirate work. You have a right to a complete explanation -- any chance of cancer? -- from the pathologist if your primary care physician or whoever did the aspirate cannot answer for you. Read more...

Last year I had a breast cyst aspirated (benign). There is another cyst in that same area this year. Do I need another aspiration?

See Doc. Recurrent cysts after aspiration should be carefully evaluated even if the original tissue or fluid was normal in evaluation. See your physician for guidance. Read more...
Risk assessment. Depending on your age, symptoms and your cancer risk profile it would be best to see your surgeon and consider a repeat procedure. Read more...

Is breast cyst removal the best option? I am 39 and have been experiencing a series of cysts in left breast. Realised I had cysts when one swelled to 6cm diameter and had to be aspirated. Before that my breast swelled every month but thought it was just

Unless . Unless otherwise instructed, you will likely be screened every 6 months to a year with a mammogram. I would follow the doctor's recommendation on this. On the other hand, has your doctor discussed birth control pills (bcp's) with you. If you are a candidate, then it is something to consider. Bcp's have been shown to drastically reduce breast cysts. Also reducing caffeine has shown a decrease as well. Lastly, limit your salt intake and wear a good supportive bra for comfort. Good luck to you. Read more...
Biopsy. If the cyst keeps coming back after repeated aspirations, a core needle biopsy can break the cyst wall and prevent it from coming back. Read more...

Will aspirating breast cyst show cancer cells or I'm just being paranoid?

Almost-never. Breast cysts are benign fluid-filled lumps that develop due to blockage within the milk ducts. A mammogram cannot differentiate between a tumor or cyst, but an ultrasound can. Rarely, a cyst can look atypical on ultrasound, leading to the recommendation for aspiration. Unless the cyst fluid is bloody, it is recommended to simply discard this fluid rather than test it. Read more...
Likely benign. Most cysts in breast are benign. You are prudent to have the abnormality checked out. Read more...
Explain. Your anxiety to your doctor. They may aspirate the cyst to give you peace of mind. Reasonable request on your part. Read more...

If a complicated breast cyst (no solid component inside cyst) is aspirated & confirmed cancerous. No nodes. What are the treatment options? Surgery?

Excisional biopsy. The next step is to excise the collapsed cyst wall and some surrounding breast tissue to confirm that the cancerous fluid is indeed from that source. Moreover, the Pathologist will now have a "tissue" diagnosis to lend a microscopic analysis of the type of cancer and the best ways to treat it. Read more...

Question for radiologist. I had U/S done. What causes a small complicated breast cyst (no solid mass component) to be more "tall than wide"?

Scarring? Without seeing the images, I cannot give you more than a general response. If a cysts has sharp margins that is a typically benign lesion. As I am radiologist, I would want to know why it is complicated. Without knowing this, I would recommend that you have a followup sonogram in 3 months. If it is stable for a year. you shouldn't need any additional follow up. Read more...